re: Dice - Die page 2

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snip Thinking about this, I think that's my usage as ... although different to you and me are not wrong.

So this means that both are equally acceptable?

Both are equally *defendable", but both will not be equally acceptable to people who erroneously consider "a dice" to be wrong.

snip
I'll wait for more people to reply to my question and hopefully clear up my confusion, but maybe I should start using "die" to be on the safe side?

I'd say that using "a die" is certainly safer than using "a dice": although the latter has a long history of use, it can cause poorly- informed people to correct your usage.
That's seldom a fight worth bothering about, but if you do decide to use "a die", be aware that you're doing it so as not to offend people who are wrong and not because "a dice" is wrong.

Cheers, Harvey
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On 26 Oct 2003, Tony Cooper wrote snip

In some board games, and in Cribbage, we use a ... a dice. You roll a die, and not a dice.

Thinking about this, I think that's my usage as well. It does appear, though, that those who "roll a dice" although different to you and me are not wrong.

I think that "die" is in current use in AmE, in UK casinos, and as a vestige among older BrE speakers. Most British people who use the things to play games at home are unfamilar with it. What English-speakers in other parts of the world do I don't know.

Don Aitken
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You can do it if you put the fingers of one hand on the top of the end of the ... the pile of garlic or onions you're dicing to the other, playing the knife like a teeter-totter all the way.

The best method to dice food in this manner is to use a mezzaluna.

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So this means that both are equally acceptable?

'die' is regarded by some educated people as technically correct, but it's not normally used. You would get some strange looks if you used it in ordinary circles.

Ah! That explains a lot. Whatever alt.fan.douglas-adams may be, it's most certainly not what you'd call "ordinary circles".

Thanks to all who have responded to help me. I'll pass on the explanation, though I'll probably also stick around for a while. So far you've made me laugh, wonder and look up things in a dictionary, plus I've learned some new things, just by reading the posts for the last week. All of those things are good, by my standards.
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Ah! That explains a lot.

But mine is a Brit view, I should add.

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I'll wait for more people to reply to my question and hopefully clear up my confusion, but maybe I should start using "die" to be on the safe side?

That's a very good strategy. You can't go wrong with using "die" as the singular.
For the record: I wouldn't use "dice" as the singular. I have probably heard it so used once or twice, but certainly not frequently. It sounds very odd to me.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
It does appear, though, that those who "roll a dice" although different to you and me are not wrong.

So this means that both are equally acceptable?

You are confusing what is technically correct with what is commonly used and recognized. Considering one to be a die, and two or more to be dice will never cause you a problem. It might be correct to refer to a single cube as a dice, but in most situations it will be questioned or rejected.
. All of those things are good, by my standards.

Whoa! Here are "standards" again. Let's hope they are not from the same style book as the Palmer standards of paragraphing.
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On 26 Oct 2003, Tony Cooper wrote snip Thinking about ... although different to you and me are not wrong.

I think that "die" is in current use in AmE, in UK casinos, and as a vestige among older BrE ... play games at home are unfamilar with it. What English-speakers in other parts of the world do I don't know.

Aren't those people in the other parts of the world using the "die" version as in "the die is cast"?
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