re: Dice - Die page 8

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I use "different from" and "different than" arbitrarily and interchangeably. I see absolutely no difference between the two.

Really? Can you use "different from" before a clause? ("He's different from we thought.") I'd have to use "than".

Then you'd be digging yourself even deeper. "He's different from how we thought" is, of course, the only correct way to do it.

HTH,
Matti
Peter Moylan filted:
I think I was somewhere in my twenties when I discovered that "the die is cast" didn't refer to a ... in the singular. It must have been at roughly the same time that I straightened out my use of "strait".

No, no, no!...not with "die"; that's for use with "dire"..

("Goodness me, goodness me, industrial disease!)...r
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Really? Can you use "different from" before a clause? ("He's different from we thought.") I'd have to use "than".

He's different from what we thought.
He's different from how we expected him to be.
He's different from (how he was) when we last saw him.

In , this seems to be a comparative adjective unmarked by or , but in
He's more different than we thought,
do we then have a double comparative, like ? How can we analyze that?
(. . .) "different to you and me" is wrong in my dialect, but probably not an error.) (. . .)

Evan, some readers would like you to eliminate the doubt about your intended meaning. Of the two elements of "different to you and me" that are contentious nowadays, which one makes you raise your eyebrows?

Sorry. Definitely the "different to". In my dialect, "different from" and "different than" are both possible, with the former being the educationally preferred one, and the latter being probably more common. "Different to" was, until I heard people say it, as bizarre as "different of" or "different with" would have been.

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In , this seems to be a comparative adjective unmarked by or , but in He's more different than we thought, do we then have a double comparative, like ?

Not at all. This is a single comparative; the "than" goes with "more" rather than with "different".
He's different. He's more different than we thought.

He's different than we expected. He's more different than we expected than we thought.
This last example is awkward, but not for grammatical reasons - just because the two "than" clauses lead to confusion.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
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No fuss or ado. "People that" is Oy!ably wrong, just as "the newspaper who I read" would be Oy!ably wrong.

Non sequitur. "People which" is wrong just as "the newspaper who". "That" doesn't come into consideration.
-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom
Can you use "different from" before a clause? ("He's different from we thought.") I'd have to use "than".

I couldn't use "from" *or* "than". It would be "from what".

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
That works well but is slow. Another method is to simply hold the blade by one hand and the handle ... care what shape the resulting bits will be. The knife must be super sharp, as I assume everyone's here is.

The best method to dice food in this manner is to use a mezzaluna.

Yeah, right. Why didn't I think of that?

Maybe you didn't have a good single blade mezzaluna - the double bladed ones look like a really good idea in the shop, but, once you start to use them you see the problem, they clog up.

Negotiation styles:
1. Say 'no', then negotiate.
2. Say 'yes', then prevaricate.
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I use "different from" and "different than" arbitrarily and interchangeably. ... the other. It seems more a convention than a rule.

Yes, it's only a convention all "rules" are only conventions but that doesn't make "different than" any different ... it's not that even that common, according to the stats Donna reported, becasue 93% of your compatriots get it right).

If 93% get it right, then the other 3% must be wrong. I don't see it as wrong. Merely different.
I'll make a special effort in the future to use "different than" all of the time. If I can tweak the noses of 93% of the people doing something as simple as this, it's a goal worth pursuing.
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