+0
Hello,

I have one other quick grammar question. What is the difference between "did you ever go to that restaurant?" and "have you ever gone to the restaurant?" My guess is that the former refers to a specific event whereas the latter refers to in general. Am I correct.

Many thanks in advance for anyone who can answer this question for me.

Simonsez
1 2
Comments  
I agree.

Despite what you will hear about how American have little use for the present perfect and use the simple past too much, I would use "have you ever been" for that question, UNLESS we were talking very specifically.

Remember how we were talking about that new Indian place that opened on Swedesford Road? You were going to go check it out. Did you ever go there? My sister is coming in next week and I thought I'd take her there if you've been and you say it was good.
Did you ever go to that restaurant? approximates, to my ear, Did you [finally / eventually] go to that restaurant, as you said you intended to do the last time I spoke to you about it? Did you ultimately carry out your stated intention to go there?

Have you ever gone to that restaurant? approximates, to my ear, Can you say that you were at that restaurant on at least one occasion in your life?
CJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I agree with Cal Jim. And it is even clearer here:

Did you ever get the chance to speak to Jim?
Have you ever had the chance to speak to Jim?
My opion is that `did you ever go to that restaurant?` was thirty years ago , while `have you ever gone to that restaurant?` was more recently.

Greetings,
Marth
Hi Marth

Please reread what Grammar Geek and CalifJim posted earlier in this thread. They have both provided accurate information.

Don't forget that the simple past tense can be used to refer to a past event or activity regardless of how long ago it was:

A: Have you talked to Bob this morning?
B: Yes, I talked to him ten minutes ago.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Don't forget that the simple past tense can be used to refer to a past event or activity regardless of how long ago it was:

A: Have you talked to Bob this morning?
B: Yes, I talked to him ten minutes ago.


Actually, there is no verb tense agreement in the example that you give, Yankee. They both should be in Present Perfect since Simple Past talks about a finished activity that does not have any relevant importance to the present. That action began and finished in the past. Period. Otherwise use the Present Perfect. Verb agreement is essential.

A: Have you talked to Bob this morning?
B: Yes, I've talked to him ten minutes ago.
AnonymousThey both should be in Present Perfect
To my ear Yankee's example is completely unremarkable, in the sense that we hear that sort of thing every day.

-- Have you seen The Green Monster?
-- Yes, I saw it last week.

In both Yankee's example and in mine immediately above, the answer contains a reference to a definite time. The present perfect is not used when a definite time is referenced.

So I can't agree that the present perfect should be used where you recommend it.

Moreover, there is no truth to the claim that the simple past has no relevance to the present. Below, the fact that Dad paid is not just relevant, but crucial, to the present situation, at least if the first speaker doesn't want to make the mistake of paying a second time. Emotion: smile

-- How much am I supposed I pay?
-- Nothing! Dad already paid yesterday.

CJ
The difference between "did you go" and "have you gone" is all about whether the asker knows the time that the action wass supposed to have taken place.

For example, let´s say that, at the last day of school, I tell you that on summer vacation I plan to travel to Argentina. When school starts again, you ask me if I did, in fact, go. But you know that, if I went, it was supposed to be at summer vacation. So, you ask the following way: "Did you go?"

Now, if you just asked me, in a random conversation, whether I went to Argentina or not, but you don´t know of a specific date when I was supposed to have gone, you would ask it the following way: "Have you gone to Argentina?"

...there. And I´m not even American Emotion: stick out tongue Emotion: stick out tongue
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more