+0
Hi, this time I've searched for it first before making a post, but I didn't find anything related to what I want to ask, so here it is! Thanks!

"I had no idea there are so many Japanese language schools here..."

"I had no idea there were so many Japanese language schools here..."

Shouldn't I use "there are" since the "Japanese language schools" referenced to are still in existence when I make that statement?

And also,

"Did you meant to say..."

and

"Did you mean to say..."

I hear "Did you mean to say" much more often than the first phrase, even though the whole sentence had happened in the past, why do we say "did you MEAN to say," with mean being in the present tense? Also then, would "had you meant to say" be the most formal way?

As always, thanks for the help!!!!!!!!
+0
Hi,

"Did you mean to say..."

The second sentence is correct. The verb after "Did" should be "mean" (present tense). This is one of the rules of grammar. It's really the 'bare' infinitive, rather than the present tense. That's a better way to think of it, otherwise you're liable to confuse yourself as to why past tense and present tense are being 'used together'.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
"I had no idea there are so many Japanese language schools here..."

"I had no idea there were so many Japanese language schools here..."

The first sentence is correct because the sentence starts with "I had" ( a verb in the past tense). You say "I didn't know you were here" although the person referred to is there when you said that sentence.

"Did you meant to say..."

"Did you mean to say..."

The second sentence is correct. The verb after "Did" should be "mean" (present tense). This is one of the rules of grammar.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Yoong Liat"I had no idea there are so many Japanese language schools here..."

"I had no idea there were so many Japanese language schools here..."

The first sentence is correct because the sentence starts with "I had" ( a verb in the past tense). You say "I didn't know you were here" although the person referred to is there when you said that sentence.

"Did you meant to say..."


"Did you mean to say..."

The second sentence is correct. The verb after "Did" should be "mean" (present tense). This is one of the rules of grammar.
"I had no idea there are so many Japanese language schools here..."

"I had no idea there were so many Japanese language schools here..."
Both sentences are correct but the second one is in keeping with the sequence of tenses and thus preferred by many.

"Did you mean to say..."
Correct, but 'mean' is not in the present tense. It is a plain infinitive, in other words, an infinitive without 'to'. The plain infinitive must be used because of the auxiliary 'do', which is in the past tense. Cf. I did know he said so.

Cheers
CB

Oh wow, thanks everybody!! So it's called a bare infinitive, that's great, thanks!!

I guess I might as well ask another question I have in this thread:

Eg)

I had been eating when Bob arrived.
I was eating when Bob arrived.

The "was" and "had been" are both past perfect, are they not? Because if "was" is meant as a past simple, that wouldn't make any sense at all! However, I've seen "I was eating when Bob arrived" used as an example of past perfect in a grammar book before.

What's the difference between, "I had always been very shy as a child" and "I was always very shy as a child"?

or in this example,
But I sent them (the pictures) anyway, without telling neither my family nor my friends, thinking that "if I become famous I'll invent a more glamorous story for the press..." and if I had been rejected, it would have saved my honour.
Shouldn't it be "if I were rejected, it would have saved my honour"?

Thanks!! =D
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
(1) "I had no idea there are so many Japanese language schools here..."

(2) "I had no idea there were so many Japanese language schools here..."

According to Cool Breeze, both sentences are correct but the second one is in keeping with the sequence of tenses and thus preferred by many.

To me:

The first sentence is correct because the sentence starts with "I had" ( a verb in the past tense). You say "I didn't know you were (not are) here" although the person referred to is there when you said that sentence.

I don't know what other members think of our views. Comments welcome.
"I had no idea there are so many Japanese language schools here..."

"I had no idea there were so many Japanese language schools here..."


Cool Breeze is the one right: both are correct.

The 1st one emphasises that this situation is still valid now.

Read my quotations from Jespersen, to my mind the god of English grammar, in:

sequence of tenses

VERY IMPORTANT STUFF
Hi,

I guess I might as well ask another question I have in this thread: It would make life simpler if you started another thread, I think. It makes the discussion easier to follow, and to respond to. OK?

Eg)

I had been eating when Bob arrived.
I was eating when Bob arrived.

The "was" and "had been" are both past perfect, are they not? Because if "was" is meant as a past simple, that wouldn't make any sense at all! However, I've seen "I was eating when Bob arrived" used as an example of past perfect in a grammar book before. I think you misinterpreted what you read. 'I was eating' is Past Continuous', not Past Perfect.

What's the difference between, "I had always been very shy as a child" and "I was always very shy as a child"?


#1 is Past Perfect. It refers to a time in the past when you had the result of being shy as a child. eg "When I met Mary, I didn't know what to say to her. I had always been very shy as a child".

#2 is Simple Past. It just states a fact about the past.

or in this example, . . . I think the same comments would apply to your next example, although I don't find your meaning completely clear.


If you have more questions, please start a new thread.

Best wishes, Clive
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

"it was not meant for you" or "it was not mean for you".