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We hadn't met for two months and then suddenly we met in June.

We didn't meet for two months and then suddenly we met in June.


What exactly is the difference between the two? I've heard both said before and they sound correct to me. Thanks kindly once again! =)
Comments  
It's purely a difference in point of view, as explained in another of my recent posts.

We hadn't met asks the reader to think in terms of an action that happened in a time period preceding the time period of the main story line. We didn't meet does not. It simply seems to the reader that the main story begins with that statement.

Another observation seems relevant here as well. The for phrase often pulls in a perfect tense. I haven't seen her for a long time. We have been out of town for months. In the past, such as found in narratives, this would be the past perfect: I hadn't seen ... We had been ...

CJ
As Jim said, but I'd add that the "do" form can imply that they decided not to meet for two months.
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But what I didn't anticpate was how thirsty I would get.

But what I hadn't anticipated was how thirsty I would get.


How about these two sentences? There is no previous action that needs to be referred to by the use of past perfect (like in the first sentence of my first post), so what are the differences here?

Thank you again!
LunchboxBut what I didn't anticpate was how thirsty I would get.

But what I hadn't anticipated was how thirsty I would get.


How about these two sentences? There is no previous action that needs to be referred to by the use of past perfect (like in the first sentence of my first post), so what are the differences here?

Thank you again!

Try to write a larger context for each one.
Lunchbox

1. But what I didn't anticipate was how thirsty I would get.

2. But what I hadn't anticipated was how thirsty I would get.


Oct. 9th...............................Oct. 10th................Oct. 11th

(time of not anticipating)......being thirsty.........(time of speaking)

In sentence #1, the speaker looks at Oct. 9th from the point of view of Oct. 11th.

In sentence #2, the speaker looks at Oct. 9th from the point of view of Oct. 10th.

Thus the past perfect in #2 makes the sentence slightly more vivid: it places us in the middle of "being thirsty", where "not anticipating this condition" is still news.

MrP

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
But what I didn't anticpate was how thirsty I would get.

But what I hadn't anticipated was how thirsty I would get.


How about these two sentences? There is no previous action that needs to be referred to by the use of past perfect ...

Anything else that might have preceded this sentence is part of the main story line. Imagine what might have preceded this sentence. Note that everything below is told in the past point-of-view. Some is simply in the past - the main story line. Some is in the past of the past - when the anticipation (or, rather, the lack of it) occurred. Some is in the future of the past - when the thirst occurred.

I ate a whole box of extra-salty potato chips/crisps, and then went jogging without my usual water-bottle. || But what I hadn't anticipated | was | how thirsty I would get.

Compare:
Present point of view
What I haven't considered yet | is | the effect my decision will have on my family.
Past point of view
What I hadn't anticipated | was | how thirsty I would get.

(Same time relationships.)

CJ
"We hadn't met asks the reader to think in terms of an action that happened in a time period preceding the time period of the main story line. "

"Anything else that might have preceded this sentence is part of the main story line."

So when does the main story line begin if the time period preceding the main story line could simultaneously be a part of and NOT a part of the main story line?

And in what situations would "But what I didn't realize was how thirsty I would get" work? How about my example?

"I filled my water bottle up to take along on my trip, but what I didn't realize (then) was how thirsty I would get."

Thanks.