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In grammar books interrogative sentences are written this way:

1: Does she not tell a lie?

2: Have you not been there?

3: Did she not tell a lie?

In above sentences subject is followed by not. But most of the time above sentences are written and spoken in this way:

1a: Doesn't she tell a lie?

2b: Haven't you been there?

3c: Didn't she tell a lie?

In above sentences subject is preceded by not (n't) rather than being followed by not.

Are sentences 1a, 2b, and 3c grammatically correct?
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Hi Jackson

The sentences in your first group sound more emphatic and/or more formal than the sentences in your second group. The grammar is fine in all of them.

However, the ability to use either 1a or 1b grammatically would be extremely limited due to the use of the simple present tense and the reference to only one lie.
Comments  
I'd say that 1a, 2b and 3c are the only ones grammatically correct! To be honest, I've never seen interro-negative sentences constructed like the first three ones.
But could it be that I'm wrong? If I were, that would mean that we never stop learning! So, speak your mind!
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Silver WillowI've never seen interro-negative sentences constructed like the first three ones.
But could it be that I'm wrong?
Have you not made an universal shout...
Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare

Do you not hope your children shall be kings...

Macbeth, William Shakespeare
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.