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Did you see a sunset yesterday?

Were you able to see a sunset yesterday?

Could you see a sunset yesterday?

Are all of them correct and carry about the same meaning?

I think the third sounds like a request.

Condition: Eeach of replies below can be used as answer to those questions if they carry about the same meaning.
"Yes, I could/did" or "No I couldn't because of a fog" or "No I didn't"

Thanks
LiJ
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the sunset

No, I wouldn't say they were the same meaning.

Did you - simply asking if the person saw it.

Were you able to/could you see - this suggests that the asker thinks there might be a reason why it was impossible for them to see the sunset (locked in a cellar?)
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People were able [possibility existed] to see the lunar eclipse in Seattle last night because there were not very many clouds. I saw it [made the attempt, successfully], but my neighbor wasn't able to get away from the tall buildings in her neighborhood [made the attempt, unsuccessfully].
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Comments  
LiveinjapanDid you see a sunset yesterday?

Were you able to see a sunset yesterday?

Could you see a sunset yesterday?
I'd use the first or second, but not the third -- although the third is understandable and acceptable as well. The second and third give the impression that the speaker believes the listener may have had some difficulty in seeing the sunset.

Did you see the sunset yesterday? Yes, I did. No, I didn't.

Were you able to see the sunset yesterday? Yes, I was. No, I wasn't.

Could you see the sunset yesterday? Yes, I could. No, I couldn't.

CJ
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I understand this issue thanks to you all, Nona, Philip, and CJ.