+0
Hi

If Tom didn't come with us to the beach, everyone would be very disappointed.

--- does the first part of the sentence refers to the future and the second one to the present? I'm not sure I understand it.
1 2
Comments  
It's called the Second Conditional. It refers to the present or to the future and expresses unreal situation.

If Tom didn't come with us to the beach, everyone would be very disappointed. It means that: He doesn't come to the beach.
Hi

Look at the very last example on this page:

http://www.englishpage.com/conditional/mixedconditional.html

According to this: If Seb DIDN'T COME with us....... refers to the future and it is a bit strange to me, though maybe it shouldn't.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
It's just a normal "Second Conditional".
If he came with us (tomorrow), we would be happy.
If he didn't come with us (tomorrow), we would be disappointed.
We would be delighted if you came with us on our trip next month.
The children's hearts would break if the teacher cancelled the outing to the zoo next week.
The children would be very sad if the teacher didn't fulfill her promise of a special treat tomorrow.
CJ
CalifJim It's just a normal "Second Conditional".

If he came with us (tomorrow), we would be happy.

If he didn't come with us (tomorrow), we would be disappointed.

We would be delighted if you came with us on our trip next month.

The children's hearts would break if the teacher cancelled the outing to the zoo next week.

The children would be very sad if the teacher didn't fulfill her promise of a special treat tomorrow.

CJ

Isn't it better to use the first conditional?

We will be happy if he comes with us

We will be disappointed if he doesn't come with us

We will be delighted if you come with us on..............

The children's hearts will break if the teacher cancells..........

Thanks

In second conditionals the past simple is hypothetical, not really time-bound...in some usage grammar books it's called 'unreal past'

Hypothesis or conditionality is not considered time-bound, at least regarding this case. Only first conditionals take the if-clause in present and the second clause in future. The rest of conditional sentences and tenses are bound by aspect (perfection) and unreal reference.

So first part refers to hypothesis, no time...the second tense is subordinated to the first one, it entails future only to the first tense.

The whole patttern looks at the future, as a sequence.

Cheers Emotion: smile
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
NewguestIsn't it better to use the first conditional?
Not necessarily, but the first conditional is also a possibility. The second conditional simply indicates that we're thinking about the situation in a hypothetical way -- musing about a possibility in a sort of theoretical way -- a sort of "What if?" way.

CJ
CalifJim
NewguestIsn't it better to use the first conditional?
Not necessarily, but the first conditional is also a possibility. The second conditional simply indicates that we're thinking about the situation in a hypothetical way -- musing about a possibility in a sort of theoretical way -- a sort of "What if?" way.

CJ

I see. So both conditionals would be OK, the only difference is that first conditional indicates that something will most probably happen and the second that it is just a hypothesis, speculation?

NewguestSo both conditionals would be OK, the only difference is that first conditional indicates that something will most probably happen and the second that it is just a hypothesis, speculation?
Yes. That's the basic idea. Emotion: smile

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more