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Hi everyone!

Could you please explain the difference between "along" and across" in the following context? I'd like to explain the difference to my students:

"Data is transferred along the data bus."
"Heads move across the disk."

"The signal moves across the VDU screen from one side to the other."
"The CPU can fetch data from memory along the data bus"

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
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Hi Mara,

I'd try to explain it like this.

across means from one side to the other side. The man walks across the road.

along means from one end to the other end. The car drives along the road.

"Data is transferred along the data bus." The bus is like a road that the data travels along.


"Heads move across the disk." The disk is not like a road. The head moves from the outside to the inside.


"The signal moves across the VDU screen from one side to the other." The screen is not like a road. It has a left side, a right side.

"The CPU can fetch data from memory along the data bus" The bus is like a road.

Best wishes, Clive

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Thanks Clive!

Now, the sentence I find confusing is the last one. How would you parse it?

"The CPU can fetch data from memory along the data bus"

1. Is it that "The CPU can fetch data from memory which is along the data bus"?

2. Or rather "The CPU can fetch data along the data bus (from memory)?

I mean, is "along the data bus" a complement of "memory" or an adverbial modifying the verb + the object > "fetch data".

Thanks a lot!

Mara.
Hi,

It's No. 2.

A bus is a set of conductors that connect A to B. Also, a big red thing with wheels that go round and a horn that goes 'beep-beep'.

Clive