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When you pay the fare to the taxi driver who is sitting right up front, you could say, “Here you are.” In this situation, could you use “There you are” instead? My take on this is that it sounds awkward because “there” in this phrase implies the thing (taxi fare) you are handing over is some distance away from yourself. Am I wrong?
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They are used interchangeably; just set phrases so the literal meaning is not too important.
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I think "There you are" sounds strange too. As you are handing the money over you would say "Here you are" or "Here you go". However, "There you are" should come at the completion after the action of handing the money. If you said "Here you are" first, then there is no need for "There you are" in my opinion.

I would use "There you are" if you are looking for someone who happens to be fairly close to you. "Oh, there you are! I was starting to think you weren't going to show up."
I agree with Nona. These expressions should not, indeed cannot, be taken literally.

None are particularly logical, in the context of the original examples, in the first place.
Let's look at what might happen if we did try to take them literally (which we shouldn't);
"There you are"
"Oh ... where am I? Oh, there I am. By the way, thank you for paying me"

"Here you go"
"Where do I go? ... Oh here? Don't forget your change."

As used in the examples of the original poster, they are all quite fine. There is no need to consider any one as being any better than any another.
Well, it is much better and more polite to use "Here u r", "There u r" is a bit impolite, as if you really didn't want to give that someone that something (mind you, it doesn't have to be money). Additionally, "There you are" can mean some other things, like "Now you get it", "my words exactly", or "you said it!", and we should avoid it anyway
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I believe " here you are" is used when you point to something close ( in terms of distance) and " there you are" is a try to draw the attention and point to somthing not that close or far.

Examples:

Taxi situation when you are handing the money: " here you are" in your mind you can say: " This is your money".

A friend is coming towards you: " There you are" in your mind you can say: "Oh, That is him coming towards me".

You are looking for your mom at home, you go to the kitchen and finally find her there: "Mom! here you are" in your mind you can say: "Oh, mom is here"

Sarah
AnonymousA friend is coming towards you: " There you are" in your mind you can say: "Oh, That is him coming towards me".

You are looking for your mom at home, you go to the kitchen and finally find her there: "Mom! here you are" in your mind you can say: "Oh, mom is here"
I don't know why, but I think I have never heard "there you are" used in place of "here you are" when someone sees/finds someone else.
Oh, here you are, I was looking for you.
Oh, there you are, I was looking for you.
Grammatically speaking, both should be possible, but I think I have always heard the first... I wonder why. Is it far more common?
KooyeenI think I have never heard "there you are" used in place of "here you are" when someone sees/finds someone else.
Really? You must get out more! Emotion: smile

Oh, there you are! is as common as mud where I live! (It's more common than the version with here, in fact.)

CJ
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Hmm, I think I got it wrong. It's "there you are" the one I've always heard, and I don't know why but I started to wonder whether "here you are" could be idiomatic as well in the same contexts. Judging from the answers here, it seems it's fine too, so... I think I can relax now, lol. Thanks.
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