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I am always confused between abstract noun and adjective, I most of the time cannot distinguish between them. So I ask, is it always true that "abstract noun tells what a subject has/possess; for example sky has blueness" and "adjective tells us what a noun is for example: sky is red"

In short, abstract noun = subject has; adjective = subject is

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keyboard hat 11In short, abstract noun = subject has; adjective = subject is

I'd hate to say that it's always true, but that seems like a good guideline.

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Thank You very much. But why hate? Btw, it took me days to figure this thing out, because there are no fixed rules in English, and there are millions and millions of exception for each and every grammar rule, making it almost impossible to a non-English country man to learn it completely, especially when only guideline available to them is a grammar book.

keyboard hat 11But why hate?

The idiom is 'hate to' + infinitive. It means 'be very hesitant to' + infinitive.

keyboard hat 11there are no fixed rules in English, and there are millions and millions of exception for each and every grammar rule

And that's why I'd hate to say it's a rule.

You wrote:

"I'd hate to say that it's always true, but that seems like a good guideline."


But usually people do write like this:

"I'd hate to say that it isn't always true, but that seems like a good guideline."

This was source of my confusion. I thought that by mistake you forgot the word "not", but now I am certain that it was deliberate.
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Different Between adjective and abstract noun
anonymous Different Between adjective and abstract noun
What is the difference between an adjective and its corresponding abstract noun?

A noun can be the subject of a sentence, or a direct object, or an object of a preposition. An adjective cannot be those things.

An adjective modifies a noun or serves as a subject complement after a linking verb. Most adjectives have three forms, e.g., low, lower, lowest. Nouns do not have such forms.

Adjectives and nouns can be related to one another. The suffixes tell you whether the word is an adjective or a noun.

Adjective; Noun

long; length
high; height
true; truth
kind; kindness
good; goodness
equal; equality
possible; possibility
scarce; scarcity

That's a very long rope. (adjective modifying the noun 'rope')
The length of this table is two meters. (noun subject of sentence)

Mrs. Snooler gave each of her children an equal amount of cake.
(adjective modifying 'amount')
All the countries on earth should strive for equality among its citizens.
(noun object of the preposition 'for')

CJ