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http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwesl/egw/nouns/plural.htm

According to the above mentioned website, Police is an aggregate noun.

The police are still looking for the Olympic Park bomber.

If it is so, then why army is always considered as a collective noun. What is the main difference between the two?

GB
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Police is a plural noun, can not have singular verb attached to it, thus not collective noun; army is a singular countable one.
There is no reason for why it is so.
BTW, I could not download the link.
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InchoateknowledgePolice is a plural noun, can not have singular verb attached to it, thus not collective noun; army is a singular countable one.
There is no reason for why it is so.
BTW, I could not download the link.
So, it means that there are plural nouns that always take plural verbs. Can you give some other examples of plural nouns.

GB
InchoateknowledgePolice is a plural noun, can not have singular verb attached to it, thus not collective noun; army is a singular countable one.
There is no reason for why it is so.
BTW, I could not download the link.

I tend to disagree. Police is mostly considered and used as a singular collective noun unless it’s a situation where more than one police department is involved.

We can answer questions and don’t mind doing so. However, learners may not retain the answers by memorization. is the better method.
I'm sorry, Goodman, but police takes the plural. The police force takes a singular, but you would never say "Police is questioning the suspect" or "The police is looking for clues to the crime."

You could say "A policeman is" or "The police force is" or "A member of the police" but not just "Police is."

I've never thought before why we think of the police as a bunch of individuals who therefore take the plural, but the army is usually taken as a singular unit. I'm sorry that I don't have a better answer as to why.
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GG,

Don't mean to disappoint your arguement. To affirm my own learning, I checked and found these:

Patrol Police is Set to Enhance the Security in Cyberjaya ... The Patrol Police adheres to the security standards of a Cybercity, whereby it takes a maximum ...

No doubt the Police has done more than enough to earn the scorn and ill-will of ... It’s best known legend, The Police is your Friend (spelt enemy) has

The Dutch police consists of 25 regional police forces and the National Police ... Each of the ' 25 police regions is headed by a regional police ...
Grammarian-bot
InchoateknowledgePolice is a plural noun, can not have singular verb attached to it, thus not collective noun; army is a singular countable one.
There is no reason for why it is so.
BTW, I could not download the link.
So, it means that there are plural nouns that always take plural verbs. Can you give some other examples of plural nouns?
I had no idea, so I checked my grammar book.

cattle, clergy, people, police, poultry, ...

the New York Yankees, the Utah Jazz, ...

I so often forget to include the caveat "in American English." I know the Brits have a different approach to some collective nouns (country, company, etc.) so it should be so with "police" as well. In American English, police is plural. Google results showed singular police used in other countries, and a great many hits for the musical group.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Does an Oxford dict. say things in BrE? Well, it also suggests "police" should be used as a plural.

Hi, IK!

I think you can open the link if you get rid of the repetitive "http://" in the address column.
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