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I have a sentence like this:

"There are 100 animals in the room, among which/of which 50 are dogs, 10 are cats, and 2 are birds."

I am trying to emphasize that there are some dogs, cats, and birds in the room (but their numbers do not total up to 100). In other words, I don't want to give a complete breakdown of the animals in the room - just on the dogs, cats, and birds.

So, is using "among which" correct in this case? I think the use of "of which" would mean I must list down all the animals. Am I mistaken?

Please help. Thank you. C.
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AnonymousSo, is using "among which" correct in this case?
Yes.
Anonymous I think the use of "of which" would mean I must list down all the animals. Am I mistaken?
Not 'must', but 'may be listing' all of them.
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Thanks for your help. Are you saying both "among which" and "of which" are equivalent in this case?
Anonymous Are you saying both "among which" and "of which" are equivalent in this case?
Yes, they would be read in the same way. Most of us can count.

From my view, they all mean the same thing and no matter which one you choose you would be getting the point across. I prefer "of which" mostly because it flows better, but either one would be doing its job.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Maybe you don't realize it, but you are answering a question that was asked quite some time ago.

Why not answer questions that are more recent? That way there's a better chance that the person who asked the question is still participating on our forum and can benefit from your answer.

CJ