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Sometimes definitions of anyway and anyways get mixed up. According to you what is the major difference between their meaning? And which sentence is more correct to say:

1: Anyways, thank you.

2: Anyway, thank you.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Forget about noun, pronoun or adverbs etc, for instance let us use the loic of the word anyway and anyways, when we use the word anyway its just one way where anyways leads us to manyways its correct to say that the word anyways is not only a non-standand form of anyway but it is below the standard.
"Anyways" means "any how". You don't say anyhows. If you do, bad grammar. Anyways is colloquial. People get used to saying things in a different way, especially when you get used to hearing it. I prefer "anyway". "Anyways" just annoys me when I hear someone using it.
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source:

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/anyway-any-way-or-anyways /
 
“Anyway” is an adverb, and it means regardless or in any event:
Example:
Marshall’s grades have slipped, but he plans to apply to Harvard anyway.
 
Then we have “anyways,” a colloquial corruption of “anyway.” It’s universally considered nonstandard and should be avoided altogether. It might help to remember that “anyway” is an   adverb, and adverbs can’t be plural.
 
 
Hope that helped.
I would prefer not to be named Anon, so I sign off as

buzzoff
 
Keep in mind too, that anyway is an adverb, and adverbs can't be plural. Anyways is more of just a corruption of anyway, I think.
Anyway is correct. "Anyways" is an example of the fact that if everyone say the same lie you agree to it too.
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Because I am not a native speaker, I question more than a native speaker about the words and grammar of English, regardless American, International or British. As far as I know, "anyways" is a bad form or ghetto English and not proper, even in the lazy American vernacular. I am very certain about this since I have argued many times over this and I have "always" been the correct one thus far.
Merriam-Webster, m-w.com, says: Definition of ANYWAYS
1. a. archaic : ANYWISE
b. dialect : to any degree at all
2. chiefly dialect : anyhow, anyway

The m-w definition of ANYWAY:
1. : ANYWISE
2. : in any case : ANYHOW

The first known use for each of the words, anyways, anyway, and anywise, was the 13th century.
I always thought it had something to do with the order of saying it.
Like;

- Anyway, I'm not going to the party tonight.
- I'm not going to the party tonight anyways.
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Anonymous"Because I am not a native speaker.... As far as I know, "anyways" is a bad form or ghetto English and not proper, even in the lazy American vernacular. I am very certain about this since I have argued many times over this and I have "always" been the correct one thus far.
The adverb "anyway" is the correct word.
However, you will hear people say "anyways" throughout North America. It is very casual, but it is certainly not "ghetto English."
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