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hi all,
just a quick question (so quick response please Emotion: big smile), what is the difference between (or how would you use it in a sentence or a context);
1. britain, the great britain, england, UK (united kingdom), ...or any other names it has
i know when to use the adjective, but i'm still confused when to use "british" or "english", e.g. for people i think we should use "british" sometimes i heard someone said "the brits are ...", so i can use "brits" in an informal context right?
2. the states, US, USA, america
not as confused as the above, sometimes i saw people wrote: "i live in the states", the US is ..., blah blah USA, when to use which?
3. perspective, viewpoint, point of view, view, paradigm, ...or any other similar names
let's say i'm in a discussion with a friend, when i'm about to say what my thoughts are about some particular things, which word should i use "my ...blah... about it is ..." --> i usually use "my view about it is that...", but what about the other words? (perspective, etc) when do you use it?

thanks for any help in advance,

satria.
Comments  
I'll leave an American to answer number 2.

1. OK, slightly confusing, I know. The UK is the political entity, comprising the countries, provinces or 'constituant entities' England, Wales, Scotland, N. Ireland plus other smaller islands. England is just one of the countries in this grouping so to call someone from Scotland English, for example, would be offensive to them. Only people from England should be called English. Great Britain - this is the name of the largest island in the group - which contains just England, Wales and Scotland. British - gets used to refer to people from the UK. Some people like 'Brit' (I obviously do) and others hate it, so I'd avoid it unless you know someone likes it.

3. We normally just say 'I think that' or simply state your opinion without any introduction. After all, you are not likely to be telling someone an opinion you do not hold personally. It's more usual to point it out when you are stating someone else's opinion, or if there is a difference of opinion. For example 'I think we should buy a Ford car but Fred would rather get a Vauxhall'. To say 'In my opinion' can sound rather pompous.
I don't see any difference between "the states," "the U.S.," and "the U.S.A." Or "America" either.

U-S-A seems to get chanted at world-wide sporting competitions. I guesss "Go United States of America!" is just too long.

Some people object to using "American" to apply to people who live in the United States of America, saying that there are two continents names America. I think that overwhelming use of "America" to equal the USA - use that exists OUTSIDE of the US as well as inside - is just too strong to overcome. If someone says "I'm an Amerian" not very many people will say "Oh, do you live in South America or North America?"

In short, they're all about the same. I rarely use U.S.A.
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Some people object to using "American" to apply to people who live in the United States of America, saying that there are two continents names America. I think that overwhelming use of "America" to equal the USA - use that exists OUTSIDE of the US as well as inside - is just too strong to overcome. If someone says "I'm an Amerian" not very many people will say "Oh, do you live in South America or North America?"

And of course even on the continent of North America, there are two other countries in addition to the U.S. Personally, I would identify myself as "an American," but I would be more likely to say "I live in the U.S." or "I live in the United States" rather than "I live in America." Especially if I was speaking to a Canadian or a Mexican! (And "The U.S." is just easier to say than "the U.S.A.", and I'm not afraid that my listeners will mistake the U.S. for "the United States of anything else" other than America.)
KhoffPersonally, I would identify myself as "an American," but I would be more likely to say "I live in the U.S." or "I live in the United States" rather than "I live in America." Especially if I was speaking to a Canadian or a Mexican!
Exactly!
I usually tell people that "I come from the States" or "I'm American."
It seems to me that I've mainly heard immigrants to the US say "I live in America" or foreigners will ask me "Are you from America?"
Nona The BritTo say 'In my opinion' can sound rather pompous.
Hi,
I didn't know that. I use it as a synonym for "I think", just to say something different and avoid to repeat "I think" more than one hundred times... I don't want to sound pompous, so I think I'll start to use"I think" more often (and "I guess" too, I like that) Emotion: smile
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I have never thought that using "in my opinion" was being pompous. Interestingly enough, using "I think" seems a bit more pompous to me. At least that's my opinion!
Seriously though, I think it's more in the delivery whether a particular opinion seems pompous or not.
Still, "I think" feels like "I" assume someone should care, as opposed to feeling like "it's only my opinion", and it really is anyway.