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I've noticed, mostly from British television programs, some discrepancies between the two "versions" of the English language. American English speakers consider groups of people to be a singular noun. IE, in America, you would say, "The audience was rising to their feet." European English consider groups, such as an audience, to be a plural noun. Across the pond, you would say, "The audience were rising to their feet."

Which of these is correct? Or is neither more correct than the other?
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Very observant! Yes, there is a tendency for AmE and BrE to differ in this way. Either way is fine.

CJ
Hi,

I guess I must live a sheltered life, because I've never heard the expression European English before.

In my experience, many British people don't even think of themselves as part of Europe (ie the British Isles are just 'near Europe'.Emotion: smile)

Best wishes, Clive
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I wanted to include all of Europe since there are more English-speaking countries outside of Great Britain.
The audience were rising to their feet.

The audience was rising to their feet.

Some grammarians consider the second sentence to be wrong as 'were' should be used with 'their' (both plural).
Hi,

I wanted to include all of Europe since there are more English-speaking countries outside of Great Britain.

Well, there's Ireland, of course, which is yet another 'island off the coast of Europe', and which is partly an English possession.Emotion: smile Do you have any other countries in mind?

Best wishes again, Clive
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I'd stick to calling it British English.

On your logic, you'd have to call American English something else as well, as loads of other countries speak that version of English. There are more speakers of American English than there are in America, the same as there are more speakers of British English than there are in Britain. But they are still called British English and American English.
HxcboatcaptainI wanted to include all of Europe since there are more English-speaking countries outside of Great Britain.
What are these countries in Europe besides Ireland?
Clivemany British people don't even think of themselves as part of Europe
That's just slum prudery. The fact is they are part of Europe geographically and after several referenda, all with positive outcomes, the UK is a key player in Europe, both politically and ecomomically.
CliveWell, there's Ireland, of course, which is yet another 'island off the coast of Europe', and which is partly an English possession.Emotion: smile Do you have any other countries in mind?
There are 457 million citizens in the European Union. Some 50% have reasonable communication in English, more than 30% have advanced English literacy skills (often greater than native speakers), and 89% of non-native English school children learn English as a second language. Overall there are more advanced English speakers in Europe than in the UK and Eire put together.
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