Difference between he is gone and he has gone?

This question has been answered · 29 replies
1 2 3 4
Dear friends,

Would you tell me what is the difference between

1) he is gone and he has gone.

2) I have to go and I am to go

Regards,

Hancy
New Member03
Thread is locked
Approved answer (verified by )
Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

Would you tell me what is the difference between

1) he is gone The verb here is 'is'. 'Gone' is used here as an adjective. It's like saying 'he is tall' or 'he is finished'.

he has gone. 'has gone' is a verb form, the present perfect. The sentence means that sometime in the past, he went, so now he's not here.

2) I have to go It's necessary for me to go. It may be because I want to, or for some reason outside me.

I am to go It's necessary for me to go. The reason is from outside me, probably because someone else is telling me it is necessary.

Best wishes, Clive
Veteran Member78,611
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
Thread is locked
ALL REPLIES
he is gone: means separation or farewell, he may not come back again or it is hard to find him

he has gone: means he is not here, but you may get him easily
Thread is locked
I am reminded of the classroom situation where the teacher says that "il est mort" can be translated either as "he is dead" or as "he has died." One student, not understanding, objects and says that there is a difference. The teacher's response: not to him, there isn't.
Veteran Member24,100
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Proficient Speaker: Users in this role are known to maintain an excellent grasp of the English language. You can only be promoted to this role by the Englishforums team.
Thread is locked
Emotion: big smile
Clive
Moderator: A super-user who takes care of the forums. You have the ability to message a moderator privately should you wish. These users have a range of elevated privileges including the deletion, editing and movement of posts when needed.Teachers: Users in this role are certified teachers. This may include DELTA, CELTA, TESOL, TEFL qualified professionals. Email a scan of your qualification to an admin, if you wish to be considered.
Thread is locked
The teacher was being objective and the student was being subjective...Two ways of trying to apprehend the world, but actually the student is more anchored in modernity than his stiff teacher !!!!
Thread is locked
thank you, that really helped me
Thread is locked
Hi,

I'd say that "he has died" is an incorrect sentence.

The Present Perfect tense has always to be with the present.

You could say "He has died, so he doesn't speak anymore" in which case you express a consequence related to the present.

In the same way, you easily may say "I have cut my finger, it's still bleeding" but you can't say "I have cut my finger", because in such a case, the action (to cut your finger) is finished and the consequence isn't even noticed.

However, the present perfect could also be used tu express an action whish you recently did. But in this case, you're talking about a consequence (or result) which operate in the present and which is a hinting. For example : "I've recently eaten my lunch" hinting "I'm full".
Thread is locked
I think the difference is one of frame of reference.

"He is gone" sounds as if the reference point is here, us, and not "him." In other words, "he is no longer with us." The phrasing ends our involvement with "him" for the time being.

"He has gone" instead shifts the emphasis a bit more to "him," and we could expect a follow-on sentence to read "I expect he is in Paris by now" or something similar.

In short, "is gone" = "he" is no longer here with us; "has gone" = "he" has gone someplace, perhaps your will find out where if you keep reading.
Thread is locked
Show more