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What is a diffrence between me and mine? Can they be used interchangeably? For e.g., "it is not my work", "it is not mine work"

Same way also tell the difference between will and shall. Can they also be used interchangeably?

Regards and thanks Emotion: smile
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Comments  (Page 2) 
**This is just a frank question. Please don't take it otherwise. Not intend to say anybody has taught me a wrong thing.Emotion: smile

I just want you to see this interview (link below) of world renowned author Christopher Hithens in Huffington Post, where he has used the word "mine" at the beginning of the sentence in the 5th paragraph of this news item. I just want to know was he also wrong grammatically? Or, as always I've not understood this "mine" grammar yet? Emotion: smile

Link: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/08/10/christopher-hitchens-im-d_n_676681.html

PS: I don't agree with all the views of Christopher. I'm just a fan his proses, writings, intellectuallity and analytical ability that is it.
Hi Razer,
This is my take. There is nothing wrong with Christopher's sentence.

"I'm a realist, I'm objective," he said. "It's not a good cancer to get. The statistics are very depressing. Mine isn't just in my esophagus, either. It's gone to my lymph nodes. I would be a very lucky person to live another five years." Mine- refers to his cancer.

Consider this:
A - My son works for Intel. He is a process engineer.

B - Really! What a coinidence! Mine too, but he is in marketing.
Mine - refers to B's son.

The previous contexts established the noun(s) and allowed " mine " to be used.
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RazerI just want to know was he also wrong grammatically? Or, as always I've not understood this "mine" grammar yet?
"mine" = "my cancer". It's just like "my book/car/house/whatever", from my earlier post. The required noun -- here "cancer" -- has to be obtained from the context.
Mr Wordy
RazerI just want to know was he also wrong grammatically? Or, as always I've not understood this "mine" grammar yet?
"mine" = "my cancer". It's just like "my book/car/house/whatever", from my earlier post. The required noun -- here "cancer" -- has to be obtained from the context.
Oh! I see Emotion: smile. Thanks a ton. Very glad. Emotion: smile
Excellent response! Best I've seen. It's what I would have given! Too many times even grammar books don't clearly distinquish between the possessive adjective and possessive pronoun but lump them together in a chart as in the Evergreen Book by Houghton Mifflin. From an ESL English Professor.
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Nowadays it's always "my"; when "mine" was used, it was only used before words beginning with a vowel - such as "eyes" in "mine eyes" or "own" in "mine own executioner"...

Incidentally, "shall" is used quite a lot in legislation to mean "must"
Thank you for taking the time to write and explain. It was great help. God bless you.