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What is a diffrence between me and mine? Can they be used interchangeably? For e.g., "it is not my work", "it is not mine work"

Same way also tell the difference between will and shall. Can they also be used interchangeably?

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"My" is possessive. "Mine" is not.

"it is not my work" is fine.
"it is not mine work" is incorrect.

You can say "this work isn't mine."

"Shall" isn't commonly used in AmE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shall
Thanks for answering. More elaboration from anybody would be more useful.
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RazerWhat is a diffrence between me and mine?
?? I assume from what follows that you are actually asking about "my" and "mine", not "me" and "mine".

"mine" works grammatically as a noun, while "my" modifies other nouns:

"it is mine" = "it is my book/car/house/whatever"

Vorpar mentioned AmE usage; "shall" is not hugely common in modern conversational British English either (though less rare, I gather, than in AmE). It is used in "shall we (do something)?" questions, and first-person sentences like "I/We shall have to talk to him about that" may also be heard from some speakers, though many people -- probably the majority -- would only ever use "I/We will...". As a general-purpose substitute for "will", "shall" can tend to sound unnaturally formal and slightly old-fashioned. There are complicated traditional rules about the use of "will" and "shall" with different persons (first, second, third) that you will find in traditional grammars, but these days almost no one fully understands them.
Hi,
RazerMore elaboration from anybody would be more useful.
Vorpar has already answered your question. If you want me to expand on the first question (at your peril, haha), here's what I'd say.

What is a the difference between "me" and "mine"? Can they be used interchangeably? For E.g., "it is not my work", "it is not mine work"

You have three words here: me, mine and my. The first two (me, mine) are pronouns: they replace nouns. The third (my) is an adjective (some call it a determiner): it modifies nouns; it doesn't replace them.

"Me" is a personal pronoun. It replaces "I" when it's the direct, indirect or prepositional object.
She saw me yesterday. (direct object)

She gave me a book. (indirect object)

She gave a book to me. (prepositional object)

"Mine" is a possessive pronoun. It means "of me" (ouch! ungrammatical!), "belonging to me".
"My" is a possessive adjective. Its meaning is the same as that of mine, but it needs a noun.
Q) Whose book is this?
A1) It's my book. (Not It's my.)
A2) It's mine. (Not It's mine book.)

Both A1 and A2 are grammatical.

A2 is probably more common, as you don't need to repeat the same word you have in the question (that is, "book") ... it generally flows better, although there may be cases in which A1 would be preferred (e.g. when you stress the word my because you want to emphasise is yours and not somebody else's).

Ops ... it took me ages to write the above post and didn't see MrW had already commented. So you now have more opinions, as you wished. Emotion: smile
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Mr Wordythough many people -- probably the majority -- would only ever use "I/We will...".
or "I'll", of course.
RazerCan they be used interchangeably? For e.g., "it is not my work", "it is not mine work"
No. Absolutely not in modern English.

The first line of the Battle Hymn of the Repubic goes like this:

Mine eyes have seen the coming of the glory of the Lord.

But that was written more than a hundred years ago. Nobody is ever going to say "mine eyes" in today's world.

In modern English, mine is used only when the following noun is omitted as understood from the context.

Those are your eyes. These are mine. (mine = my eyes)
That is Henry's coat. Which one is mine? (mine = my coat)

CJ
Thanks for your reply Tanit, Mr. Wordy and CalifJim. Really helped a lot. Emotion: smile
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