Hi,

What is the main difference between names of Jews and Christians?

Sincerely,

Vijay
1 2
These days there are fewer differences. Did you mean traditional first names or surnames?
I think this is a hard topic. I wouldn't say that there are such clear differences nowadays. Some names are known as 'Jewish' but lots of non-Jewish people have them as well. Likewise, not all Jewish people have traditionally Jewish names.
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Hi,

1: Does David name belong to Jews? Tell me some names which always belong to Jews.

2: Can two first cousins marry each other in Christianity?

3: Are two first cousins allowed to marry each other in Judaism?

4: Do Jews and Christians intermarry?

In above questions I'm talking about practicing Jews and Christians.
1. There aren't any names that are always Jewish. There aren't exactly any laws about it. There are some names which are perhaps more commonly used by Jewish people. David is not one of them, it's quite a common name among Western people of all sorts of religions.

2. Yes, they can. Some countries have laws against it - it is not legal in many (if any) US states but is legal in most other western countries.

3. I don't know.

4. Yes, of course.
1: Because Christianity and Judaism both arise from a single tradition, they share the same names and, although a relatively obscure hebrew name such as "Mordecai" would be more common tamongst people of hebrew descent, there is no names from which one can draw a definite distinction

2 and 3. In Judaism first cousins are not allowed to marry and, although I don't think christianity has any explicit prohibitions on these types of marriage, it is definitly something that western society as a whole rejects rather strongly.

4. Orthodox jews are stongly opposed to intermarriage on the grounds that it has been the main reason that people abandon their traditional judaism. Practicing Christians oppose intermarriage because they believe a marriage in which only one person follows the faith will inevitably face conflict and disagreement.
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Just a further comment on Michigander's answers.

2) Yes, you are from the states and there are strong feelings against it there (and laws). But other parts of the western world don't necessarily 'reject it rather strongly'. I wouldn't say it happens a lot (after all, we tend not to develop these sorts of feelings about relatives) but it is seen as a bit odd rather than outright wrong in the UK for example.

4) However, there are inter-faith marriages. Practicing Jews do marry people outside their faith, and so do practicing Christians. Perhaps the majority wouldn't want to, but it does happen.
Nona The Brit4) However, there are inter-faith marriages. Practicing Jews do marry people outside their faith, and so do practicing Christians. Perhaps the majority wouldn't want to, but it does happen.

Absolutely. The more orthodox in any faith may not like it or approve of it, but the more "reformed" or liberal practioners have no problem with it. Problems occur when you don't respect each other's beliefs and expect the other person to change to your way of thinking, but may families happily have a "Hannukah Bush" instead of a Christmas tree, and exchange presents wrapped in Santa paper. There is more than one way to know God.
>> Yes, they can. Some countries have laws against it - it is not legal in many (if any) US states but is legal in most other western countries. <<

Twenty-four states prohibit marriages between first cousins. States generally recognize marriages of first cousins married in a state where such marriages are legal.
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