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Hi,

Can you check the correctness of the following sentences? If they are correct grammatically, do they differ in meanings?
Thank you very much!Emotion: smile

He works in a nearby library.
He works in a library nearby.
He works in a near library.

He works in a nearby library to the east.
He works in a near library to the east.

We're going to build a new school nearby the station.
We're going to build a new school near the station.

The Smiths are our relatives. They live nearby.
The Smiths are our relatives. They live near.

This boy cannot kick the soccer far. He can only kick it near.
This boy cannot kick the soccer far. He can only kick it nearby. (I think it is wrong.)

The new houses are built too near to us.
The new houses are built too nearby to us. (I think it is incorrect.)

The new houses are built near to us.
The new houses are built nearby us.

In fields nearby, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a nearby lion is approaching.
In nearby fields, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a lion nearby is approaching.
In nearby fields, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a near lion is approaching.
In nearby fields, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a nearby lion is approaching near.

That haunted house is near.
That haunted house is nearby.

Is there a gym nearby? Yes. Go east; it is five minutes’ walk away.
Is there a gym near us? Yes. Go east; it is five minutes’ walk away.
Is there a gym near to us? Yes. Go east; it is five minutes’ walk away.

I can’t find the buffet restaurant. I think it is somewhere nearby. Last time when I came here, I found there was a billboard above the restaurant.

On a road near Chattanooga, there was a car accident.
On a road nearby Chattanooga, there was a car accident.

One day last week, I was driving my car. I saw a truck rushing near to me. / I saw a truck rushing near me.
I hurried to swerve my car, and that truck brushed away. It was so dangerous.
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Comments  
These are OK:

He works in a nearby library.
He works in a library nearby.
He works in a nearby library to the east.
We're going to build a new school near the station.
The Smiths are our relatives. They live nearby.
The new houses are built too near (to) us.
In fields nearby, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a nearby lion is approaching.
In nearby fields, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a lion nearby is approaching.
In nearby fields, sheep are eating grass quietly, not knowing a nearby lion is approaching near.
That haunted house is nearby.
Is there a gym nearby? Yes. Go east; it is five minutes’ walk away.
Is there a gym near us? Yes. Go east; it is five minutes’ walk away.
Is there a gym near to us? Yes. Go east; it is five minutes’ walk away.
I can’t find the buffet restaurant. I think it is somewhere nearby.
On a road near Chattanooga, there was a car accident.
Thank you for you kind help.

"He works in a near library." Wrong.
When can we use "a" + "near"?
How about this sentence? "Canada is a near country. It just borders us (our America)."

"The Smiths are our relatives. They live near." Wrong.
"Near" is also an adverb. Why can't we say "they live near"?

"This boy cannot kick the soccer far. He can only kick it near."
Why is this one wrong? How do you say it?

"The new houses are built near to us."
Is this wrong?
Since you passed "The new houses are built too near (to) us", I see no reason you failed this one.

Having come to this point, I kind of feel "near" as an adverb should be used in movement like "the lion is approaching near". Is that right?

Is there a gym nearby? Is there a gym near us? Is there a gym near to us?
I believe: nearby, adverb; the first near, preposition; the second near, adjective.
Are the three sentences totally the same in meanings?

"One day last week, I was driving my car. I saw a truck rushing near to me. / I saw a truck rushing near me.
I hurried to swerve my car, and that truck brushed away. It was so dangerous. "
Can you correct this sentence?
If "one day" can't be used to refer to the past, which one is equivalent?

Thank you very much for your patience. My questions are toooo many.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
"He works in a near library." Wrong. When can we use "a" + "near"? How about this sentence? "Canada is a near country. It just borders us (our America)."

These are the dictionary definitions of the adjective:

8.being close by; not distant: the near fields.

9.being the lesser in distance: the near side.

10.short or direct: the near road.

11.close in time: the near future.

12.closely related or connected: our nearest relatives.

13.close to an original: a near translation.

14.closely affecting one's interests or feelings: a matter of near consequence to one.

15.intimate or familiar: a near friend.

16.narrow or close: a near escape.

17.thrifty or stingy: near with one's pocketbook.

18.(of two draft animals hitched together) being on the driver'sleft (as opposed to off ): The near horse is going lame .

Only #s 9, 11, 12 and 18 sound familiar or normal to me. It is evidently a regional thing.

"The Smiths are our relatives. They live near." Wrong. "Near" is also an adverb. Why can't we say "they live near"?-- To my ear, it is not an adverb: its prepositional phrase (requiring an object) is the adverbial: 'they live near us'. The adverb is 'nearby': 'they live nearby'.

"This boy cannot kick the soccer far. He can only kick it near." Why is this one wrong? How do you say it?-- 'He cannot kick it far'. Using 'near' here sounds like children's English to me.

"The new houses are built near to us." Is this wrong? Since you passed "The new houses are built too near (to) us", I see no reason you failed this one.- I am uncomfortable with 'to' in those sentences and would never write them myself, but I realize that some people do. I cannot control everyone's language habits.

Having come to this point, I kind of feel "near" as an adverb should be used in movement like "the lion is approaching near". Is that right?-- That may well be.

Is there a gym nearby? Is there a gym near us? Is there a gym near to us? I believe: nearby, adverb; the first near, preposition; the second near, adjective. Are the three sentences totally the same in meanings?-- The meanings are the same, though the first in context could instead mean 'near them', 'near him', etc. I still don't like the 3rd.

"One day last week, I was driving my car. I saw a truck rushing near to me. / I saw a truck rushing near me. I hurried to swerve my car, and that truck brushed away. It was so dangerous. " Can you correct this sentence? If "one day" can't be used to refer to the past, which one is equivalent? -- "One day last week, I was driving my car, and I saw a truck rushing toward me. I swerved and the truck swept past. It was very dangerous. "
Thank you for your professional input!

What if somebody comments on the distance a child reaches in the games?
"You didn't kick the soccer ball very far!" instead of "You kicked it too near"?
"You didn't jump very far" instead of "You jumped too near"?
"You didn't blow the bubble very far" instead of "You blew it too near"?

Now I seem to feel that "the near + object" is valid, while 'a near + object" is very rarely heard.
And when we say "the near + object", we are comparing two objects.
Do you think so?

Thanks
What if somebody comments on the distance a child reaches in the games? -- The first of each pair is natural; the 2nd ones are so unusual as to not make sense to me.
"You didn't kick the soccer ball very far!" instead of "You kicked it too near"?
"You didn't jump very far" instead of "You jumped too near"?
"You didn't blow the bubble very far" instead of "You blew it too near"?

Now I seem to feel that "the near + object" is valid, while 'a near + object" is very rarely heard.
And when we say "the near + object", we are comparing two objects.
Do you think so?-- Yes, that sounds reasonable.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks very much!

Perhaps the second ones sound too harsh to a child, besides ungrammatical.
The first ones sound milder, I believe.
Hi, Mister Micawber

One more question for you. Thank you.

I know "he kicked the soccer ball near" is wrong.
But how about this one? "Kick the soccer ball near me".
Is it correct?

Thanks
We're starting to drift into the area of strange statements, but I suppose it is OK. We expect 'to me'.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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