+0
hi all,

my name is ellen and my english exam is coming up but there is one question in my course I keep strugling with:

namely, what is the difference between a passive and acausative?

I know that a causative describes something being done for someone by someone else. And I think that a causative can only be found in an active sentence. Is that correct?

How do I explain the difference? Please help

a desperate belgian girl
Comments  
Hi Ellen,

what is the difference between a passive and a causative? Sorry, I'm not familiar with the grammar term 'causative', perhaps someone else can offer an opinion.

I know that a causative describes something being done for someone by someone else.

Mary cooked dinner for Tom fits this definition. Is that what you mean?

And I think that a causative can only be found in an active sentence.

Dinner was cooked for Tom by Mary is the passive version, and seems to have the same meaning as the active version.

I think you need to look carefully at your definition of a causative, and at some examples of it. As I said, perhaps someone else here can offer you more information.

Good luck with the exam,

Clive
Hey Ellen, I am not sure what is causative so I'll try my best to explain passive.

The normal sentence structure is <subject> <verb> <object>.

The passive form is the reversed structure of a normal sentence, <object> <passive form verb> <subject>.

Example: The Government elects Sean Kennedy as the next Prime Minister.
Passive: Sean Kennedy is elected as the next Prime Minister by the Government.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Active: Mary washed the dog.
Passive: The dog was washed by Mary. The dog was washed.

Causative 'have' with active: I had Mary wash the dog.
Causative 'have' with passive: I had the dog washed by Mary. I had the dog washed.

Causative 'make' with active: I made Mary wash the dog.

The following is not correct.
Causative 'make' with passive: I made the dog (be) washed by Mary. I made the dog (be) washed.

I hope that helps.
CJ
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/index.htm ypu can find the answer here good luck
Clive,

Why would you respond to a question where you don't know the answer to what is being asked?
I see this all the time in forums and can't understand why people feel the need to interject "something" even it it's not what is really being asked. Don't mean to be rude, I realize you are just trying to help. But it seems less helpful to offer up information that doesn't really touch on the specifics of a question.

Alex
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Clive I understood what you mean but you said us about passive and active; however, question was about Active and Passive Causative not about just Active and Passive sencentce
I will tell you between different active and passive causative.
Causative verbs are used when one thing or person causes another thing or person to do something. There are two basic causative structures: an active form and a passive form.
The active form is the following:
Mary had her sister write the letter.
(Mary didn't write the letter. Her sister wrote the letter. In a sense, Mary asked her sister to write the letter and she accepted.)

The passive form is the following:
Jim had the house painted.
(Jim did not paint the house. Someone else painted the house but in this form we don't know who.)
Emotion: shake hands