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Hi, can anyone tell me what the differences are between question and problem, such as in meanings and usages ? Or, they are interchangable? I don't find any explanation for this in the dictionaries. Thank you for your kindly help.

roy

p.s. I searched the website, but couldn't find if such a question has been asked or not. If yes, please kindly let me know the link. Thank you.
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Hi,

It's better if you give us some examples of sentences that you need help with, so that we can clearly see what your difficulty is.

Perhaps you mean this kind of thing?

There is a question about his loyalty to the company. This suggests we want to know. However, his possible lack of loyalty may not yet have caused any problems. We just want to know.

There is a problem about his loyalty to the company. Some problem has occured.

Often, in practice, the 2 words are interchanged in this kind of context.

Best wishes, Clive
a question is what you raise to find answers.
a problem is what you encounter as difficulties.

you may say "I have problems with your service", meaning your are not happy with their service and you want to make a complaint.

if you say "I have a question about your service", meaning you want some information regarding their service.
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Hi,

I wonder if there are any reference books providing such subtle differences in meaning for these 'synonyms' since sometimes most dictionaries don't have further explanation. Or, by other what channels to get this kind of information ? Thank you.
Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

In general terms, my advice is simply to read a lot of English. There is no quick shortcut to learning such things.

Best wishes, Clive
SimplebeingI wonder if there are any reference books providing such subtle differences in meaning for these 'synonyms' since sometimes most dictionaries don't have further explanation. Or, by other what channels to get this kind of information ? Thank you <>
I'd suggest buying:

Merriam Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms: A Dictionary of
Discriminated Synonyms With Antonyms and Analogous and Contrasted
Words

and/or getting a subscription ($30 or thereabouts/year) to:



which has a pretty strong synonym section with many words, e.g.:

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synonyms PROBLEM, PUZZLE, ENIGMA, RIDDLE, CONUNDRUM: mystery refers to a matter inexplicable, one that defies attempts at explanation, or to something kept secret but intriguing and compelling speculation <this mystery of growth of life -- Richard Jefferies> <the veil of mystery that shrouds human sleep -- Webb Garrison> <the disappearance of the Erebus and Terror in the Arctic was one of the great mid-Victorian mysteries -- Times Literary Supplement> PROBLEM, more commonplace in its suggestions, refers to any question calling for solution or answer or to any factor causing perplexity and concern <the problem of spontaneous generation -- J.B.Conant> <with the shipping problem resolved by the allocation of ships to France -- Current Biography> <the withdrawn child or adolescent is, in the long run, more likely to become a serious psychological problem than is the mildly aggressive child -- Paul Woodring> PUZZLE applies to any problem notably baffling and challenging one's ingenuity or skill <there are few things in the world so difficult to explain as real change; it appears to me that most scientists are far from realising the complexity of this metaphysical puzzle -- W.R.Inge> ENIGMA applies to whatever is quite obscure or inscrutable and challenges one's ingenuity for an answer <he became an enigma. One side or the other of his nature was perfectly comprehensible; but both sides together were bewildering -- Jack London> <just what his objectives are is an enigma, for he has been extremely adept in refusing to commit himself too far -- Vance Johnson> RIDDLE indicates a question or problem involving paradox or contradictions, often light, and usually proposed for solution as an indication of wit or intellect <I've got a brand-new riddle for you ... what's the difference between a cat and a comma? ... a comma's a pause at the end of a clause, and a cat's got claws at the end of its paws -- J.W.Ellison b.1929> CONUNDRUM may apply to punning riddles or to unsolvable problems inviting speculation <Octavius -- he was not for nothing the scion of banking stock -- looked beyond the political conundrum to the economic problems of the land -- John Buchan>


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A question is anything you ask; a problem is anything you struggle with.
A question is something you ask, hoping for an answer
A problem is something for which you seek a solution

There are some people who say "There are no problems, only solutions", meaning that nothing is impossible to resolve.
"A question is something you ask, hoping for an answer"

Not always true. I may ask a retorical question in which case I may not hope for an answer.

"A problem is something for which you seek a solution"

Replace 'you' with 'one'. It may be someone else's problem in which case I may not be seeking a solution, but they certainly will be.

"There are some people who say "There are no problems, only solutions", meaning that nothing is impossible to resolve."

There sure are problems, and each problem has endless solutions.
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