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I'm copying the following text from some other source:

Round can work as a noun, an adjective, a verb, an adverb and a preposition. Around can work as an adverb or a preposition.

Examples given for each word, when they act as prepositions, are:

around the corner. / round the corner.

Question 1: Please give me an example where around is used as an adverb.

Question 2: Is around being used as a preposition in the following sentence?

Phileas Fogg circumnavigated around the world in 80 days.

Question 3: Which of the following sentences is more correct to say?

  1. 1: Is around being used as a preposition in the following sentence?
  2. 2: Is around used as a preposition in the following sentence?u
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Question 1: Please give me an example where around is used as an adverb.

1. In the sense of 'surrounding a place': all around was an expanse of white snow.

2. Meaning 'in an indefinite place': the newspaper must be somewhere around.

Question 2: Is around being used as a preposition in the following sentence?

Yes.

Question 3: Which of the following sentences is more correct to say?

They both seem equally correct to me.

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Round can work as a noun, an adjective, a verb, an adverb and a preposition. Around can work as an adverb or a preposition. Round and around both can be used as adverb and preposition.
Then are the following sentences if round is used instead of around?
1. In the sense of 'surrounding a place': all round was an expanse of white snow.
2. Meaning 'in an indefinite place': the newspaper must be somewhere round.
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'Round' and 'around' as adverbs don't necessarily have the same definitions.

All round was an expanse of white snow. [Y]

The newspaper must be somewhere round. [N]
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Jackson6612the newspaper must be somewhere round.
In that context round refers to shape. For example a circular table.
Bokeh
Jackson6612
the newspaper must be somewhere round.

In that context round refers to shape. For example a circular table.
Do you mean in the context of the newspaper? Sorry, but I've never seen a round newspaper before. Emotion: smile
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No!
The newspaper is somewhere round. It's on the round table.
The newspaper is somewhere green. It's on the lawn.
BokehNo!
The newspaper is somewhere round. It's on the round table.
The newspaper is somewhere green. It's on the lawn.
These sentences evoke a game of treasure hunt or something like that!
BokehNo!
The newspaper is somewhere round. It's on the round table.
The newspaper is somewhere green. It's on the lawn.
The newspaper must be somewhere round = The newspaper must be somewhere on the round table.

Would you give an explanation for the above equality?
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