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Sorrryyyy for asking that much questions....

But I don't understand the difference for example: I have a problem. and I'm having a problem.
In general modal verbs... If you have had a bad day, do you say: I'm having a bad day or I have a bad day?
Or do you say: I'm excited or I'm being excited?

And another continuous question. Do you say: You drive me crazy or You are driving me crazy?
You drive me crazy: Always and you're driving me crazy only now?

Thank you soo much
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I would suggest that there is a time difference between "I have a problem" and "I'm having a problem."
"I have a problem"--you have an ongoing problem (it is still with you).
I have a problem with finding shoes that fit.
"I'm having a problem"--you are in the midst of struggling with this problem. It is right now.
"I'm having a problem getting my shoes tied tightly."

You would therefore say: "I'm having a bad day." (You are in the midst of it.) If the day was done, then you would say: "I had a bad day." You would not say "I have a bad day." to talk about the present. You could say "I have a bad day now and then."

There is also a difference in meaning between "You drive me crazy" (as a general rule) and "You are driving me crazy" (right this moment).

Clear?
louiSTDo you say: You drive me crazy or You are driving me crazy?
You drive me crazy: Always and you're driving me crazy only now?
This example gets at the basic difference.

are driving me crazy --- only now
drive me crazy --- always, usually, regularly, often, habitually, sometimes, ...
louiSTI'm having a bad day or I have a bad day?
Same logic.

You say I'm having a bad day if the bad day is today.
You don't say I have a bad day without adding something more that makes it clear that this is a regularly recurring experience:
I usually have a bad day if I oversleep.
louiSTI have a problem. and I'm having a problem.
These two are more nearly the same than in the previous example.

having a problem --- at the moment. Emphasis on the on-going nature of the struggle to solve the problem. Some hint perhaps that the problem needs immediate attention, that there is an urgency for the problem to be solved.
have a problem --- during the current time period. A neutral statement that a problem exists and needs to be addressed. No indication that the problem needs to be solved immediately.
louiSTI'm excited or I'm being excited?
Not I'm being excited. This pattern creates a passive.

The passive is I am being (excited) / [He / She] is being (excited) / [We / You / They] are being (excited).
These mean Somebody is exciting me / Somebody is exciting [him / her]. / Someone is exciting [us / you / them].
These can have a sexual connotation, so they should be avoided.

Say I'm excited. That's more like I'm enthusiastic.

CJ
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yeah. but what is with for example "think" I think you're right. Why not: I'm thinking you're right. It's a state verb to, but in this context it's used now....

or with remember: Do you say: "Are you remembering" or "Do you remember"? Is there a difference in meaning? Because I have already seen both...

and in general with the verb "become". when do i use there the continuous?

But with these verbs you said it's clear! Nice declarations!
I love your answers!! Emotion: big smile Ou haha. Yeah sure.Thanks! But "you're being shy" you can use?! It's not a passive. And the difference between "you're being shy" and "you are shy" then would be: 'You're being shy' is just at the moment, and 'you are shy' is like every day?
Just a couple of comments:
Think. I think and I am thinking mean pretty much the same. Right now usages. If you want a continuing usage, say: I have thought so-and-so (and do so today).
Remembering--yes, two different meanings. "Are you remembering" means "are you currently in the act of remembering this event." "Do you remember" means "If you put your mind to it , can you remember this event which I am now describing." (A future act).
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Hi

which is correct?

How long have you learnt English
How long have you been learning English

someone said

How long have you learnt English is wrong. You should stick with the progressive How long have you been learning English which refers to the progress you've made over the years hence the name of the tense the progressive present perfect.

Does the answer make sense to you especially [which refers to the progress you've made over the years hence the name of the tense the progressive present perfect.]
>

Yes. "excited" is the past participle of the verb "to excite" so it makes a passive when combined with am, is, are, ....

"shy", on the other hand, is just a plain adjective.

You are shy -- This is one of your character traits. This is how you (always) are. You are (always) a shy person.

You are being shy -- You are acting shy (now). You are behaving like a shy person.

CJ

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Okay. One more thing: In school, if you raise your hands to ask a question. Do you say: I have a question (What I usually say) or I'm having a question. Because you actually have your question only for the topic you just do. I'm sorry for all these easy questions, but I'm not from an English-speaking-country, and there we haven't continuous forms. And yes I will use the Reply one Emotion: smile
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