Hello,
Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about the difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I could not catch the complete conversation, but it led me to think that there is a difference between the usage of 'thank you' and 'thanks'. Also, appropriate situations required the appropriate use of one or the other term especially at work. Could some one please tell what is the difference between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two.
Thanks
Kamur
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Kumar wrote on 30 May 2004:
Hello, Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about the difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I ... one please tell what is the difference between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two.

This seems to be a personal issue for most native English speakers, but I hate the use of "Thanks" except ironically or in song lyrics, which don't matter when talking about English usage anyway.

"Thanks" is just too informal, curt, and dismissive to my ears. It always sounds and feels insincere. I always use "Thank you" both in speech and in writing, and it doesn't matter who I write or speak to. I say "Thank you" to my 8-year-old son: I don't want him saying "Thanks" to me.
Most native English speakers will not feel as I do about this, I'm sure. "Thanks" is informal; "Thank you" is polite and formal. You have to decide which form is appropriate for you and the situation you find yourself in at work. I don't see anything wrong with using "Thank you" in every situation.
As I said, I doubt that most native English speakers will agree with me on this, but I feel that using "Thanks" is rude, uncouth, barbaric, and insensitive. People who use it are also likely to use things like "Well, duh, . . .", and a host of other barbarisms.

But they will defend themselves vigorously and claim that this is the way the language is used by most native English speakers these days. I will have to sigh and sadly agree. Just because almost everyone does it doesn't make it good or right or aesthetically pleasing.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Hello, Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about the difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I ... one please tell what is the difference between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two.

There is no difference in AmE. If you were writing a letter you should choose "Thank you" because it is slightly more formal. If you are writing a memo or a note, "thanks" is entirely appropriate. In conversation, there is absolutely no difference in meaning.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Hello, Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone ... and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two.

There is no difference in AmE.

OY! Don't pay attention to ***'s false information, Kumar.
If you were writing a letter you should choose "Thank you" because it is slightly more formal.

So there is* a difference. And it's *more than slight.
If you are writing a memo or a note, "thanks" is entirely appropriate.

OY! Don't pay attention to ***'s false information, Kumar.
In conversation, there is absolutely no difference in meaning.

OY! Don't pay attention to ***'s false information, Kumar.

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
AUEer Emeritus & Eremitus
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
«Pensad siempre en AUE y dedicad, con amor y devoción, lo mejor de vuestros esfuerzos a los AUEers». -Los Reyes
Hello, Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about the difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I ... one please tell what is the difference between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two.

You'd have to be pretty sad to believe there's a difference between "thank you" and "thanks". So, ignore such nonsense and get on with life.

Adrian
In our last episode,
(Email Removed), the lovely and talented Kumar
broadcast on alt.usage.english:
Hello, Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about the difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I ... please tell what is the difference between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two. Thanks

"Thanks" is informal. It is appropriate for small favors from friends, and is used for small acknowledgments in situations in which there is not really a gift or a favor. For example, if the supply clerk gives you supplies you have ordered, you say "Thanks." The supply clerk is not really giving you a gift, and he is not doing you a favor since it is his job.
"Thank you" is for formal situations, writing, genuine gifts, or favors. "Thank you" is never wrong.
In most situations, most people will not notice or will not attach any significance to which one you choose.

Lars Eighner finger for geek code (Email Removed) http://www.io.com/~eighner / "The very essence of the creative is its novelty, and hence we have no standard by which to judge it." Carl R. Rogers, On Becoming a Person
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
} Kumar wrote on 30 May 2004:
}
}> Hello,
}>
}> Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about }> the difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I could not catch the }> complete conversation, but it led me to think that there is a }> difference between the usage of 'thank you' and 'thanks'. Also, }> appropriate situations required the appropriate use of one or the }> other term especially at work. Could some one please tell what is }> the difference between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business }> related usage of these two.
}
} This seems to be a personal issue for most native English speakers, } but I hate the use of "Thanks" except ironically or in song lyrics, } which don't matter when talking about English usage anyway. }
} "Thanks" is just too informal, curt, and dismissive to my ears. It } always sounds and feels insincere. I always use "Thank you" both in } speech and in writing, and it doesn't matter who I write or speak to. } I say "Thank you" to my 8-year-old son: I don't want him saying } "Thanks" to me.
}
} Most native English speakers will not feel as I do about this, I'm } sure. "Thanks" is informal; "Thank you" is polite and formal. You } have to decide which form is appropriate for you and the situation } you find yourself in at work. I don't see anything wrong with using } "Thank you" in every situation.
}
} As I said, I doubt that most native English speakers will agree with } me on this, but I feel that using "Thanks" is rude, uncouth, } barbaric, and insensitive. People who use it are also likely to use } things like "Well, duh, . . .", and a host of other barbarisms. }
} But they will defend themselves vigorously and claim that this is the } way the language is used by most native English speakers these days. } I will have to sigh and sadly agree. Just because almost everyone } does it doesn't make it good or right or aesthetically pleasing.

Thanks.

R. J. Valentine
}
}>Hello,
}>
}>Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone else about the }>difference of 'Thank You' and 'Thanks'. I could not catch the complete }>conversation, but it led me to think that there is a difference }>between the usage of 'thank you' and 'thanks'. Also, appropriate }>situations required the appropriate use of one or the other term }>especially at work. Could some one please tell what is the difference }>between 'thank you' and 'thanks' and any business related usage of }>these two.
}>
} There is no difference in AmE. If you were writing a letter you } should choose "Thank you" because it is slightly more formal. If you } are writing a memo or a note, "thanks" is entirely appropriate. In } conversation, there is absolutely no difference in meaning.

Well, there's a little difference. The mood or number or something in "Thank you" is a little hard to puzzle out (is that an imperative or just one thank or what that is being transmitted?). But the "Thanks" form is a little more perfunctory, and the "Thank you" a little less, and there's a place for both. I knew someone once who would say "Thank you very much" for change back from a bus driver (back in the days when buys drivers made change). That somehow reminds me of someone who claims to use "Thank you" to everyone, but who hasn't yet thanked anyone (that I recall) for correcting his English usage.I can think of only one time where I recognized a significant difference. I used for a while to work at a place that gave out certificates for the highest bracket in the performance evaluations. So okay, you had to show up, and they acted like they were doing you a favor, and I don't think I ever worked up more than a "Thanks" when handed one, when I'd rather get back to work. But one manager three levels above me on the pecking order actually stopped moving, looked me in the eye, and said "Thank you".

That happened one time, about 1974 (give or take a year), but it made an impression, and I don't think that "Thanks" would have had the same effect. I don't think it would have had the same effect if he had said it every time he followed me through a swinging door and every time I said "Gesundheit".
The guy died a month or two ago, and I had a good thought for him.

R. J. Valentine
Don't get me started on "Thank you so much".
Lars Eighner wrote on 30 May 2004:
Hello, Last friday, someone at my office was briefing someone ... and 'thanks' and any business related usage of these two.

"Thanks" is informal. It is appropriate for small favors from friends, and is used for small acknowledgments in situations in ... is not really giving you a gift, and he is not doing you a favor since it is his job.

And so we diminish the significance of his job by being informal and truncated. When the doctor saves your life, you want to say "Thank you very, very much, Doctor", but, given your argument here, and given my analogy, I'd have to say that you could not defend that, because, after all, the doctor "is not really giving you a gift, and (s)he is not doing you a favor since it is (her) job" by saving your life.
I don't disagree with you that this is how most people think and feel, Lars, but I find it insupportable. We save the formalities for people who are, we feel, better than we are, and use familiarities with those we think are on the same level or those we feel superior to.
Americans like to claim that they are egalitarians, but these priapic little aristocratic artifacts belie the assertion and demonstrate that we are really no different from everyone else in the world, despite the phony rhetoric of the crusading purveyors of American- style democracy.
"Thank you" is for formal situations, writing, genuine gifts, or favors. "Thank you" is never wrong. In most situations, most people will not notice or will not attach any significance to which one you choose.

Yes, I agree with most of what you have said here. The exception is noted above.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor.
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more