+0

What's difference between "toss" and "throw"

I can toss the key and I can throw the key.


Whats mean: "Bears are on the loose" "you just to be a big deal"

+1

What's the difference between "toss" and "throw"?

I can toss the key and I can throw the key.

In this context, there's no difference.

Your supplementary question means nothing to me.

Comments  
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Rover_KEI can toss the key and I can throw the key.

And can't I also say in BrE — Your lot can also bung the key?

(In AmE we have neither "your lot" nor "bung". Emotion: smile Just checking if I've got those right.)

CJ

Generally, "toss" implies a more casual and careless motion, while "throw" suggests a more deliberate and aimed motion, for example:


He tossed the car keys on the bed.


He threw the car keys to his son.


"The bears are on the loose." is heard in the context of stock markets, "bears" being investors who relish a downward trend in the markets. "You just want to be a big deal." means the listener is pompous and a showoff.

A toss is underhand (beanbag in cornhole) and a throw is overhand (like a baseball)

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

The WORD "Toss" seems to refer to a more casual action that is poorly directed than the word "Throw", and has less forceful impact the verb " to THROW"!

Maybe you don't realize it, but you are answering a question that was asked more than years ago.

Why not answer questions that are more recent? That way there's a better chance that the person who asked the question is still participating on our forum and can benefit from your answer.

Please don't post in boldface type. Thanks.

CJ