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hi) please tell what difference between used to do and be used to do

I used to read long texts (for example)

I was used to read long texts

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Лена ЛемешеваI used to read long texts (for example)

I used to read long books like "The Brothers Karamazov" by Fyodor Dostoevsky. (It was a habit in the past.)


I was used to reading long books like "The Brothers Karamazov" by Fyodor Dostoevsky. (You were accustomed to doing this. This is not a good example.)


Here is a better example which I think you will understand:

A vast majority of people who install apps on their computers are used to clicking the "accept" box without reading the contract or terms and conditions. They don't bother reading the text. They just install the app.

Years ago, when I installed a new app on my computer, I used to read every word of the long contract with all the terms and conditions, but now I don't bother doing it any more.

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[1] I used to read long texts.

[2] *I was used to read long texts.

[3] I was used to reading long texts.


[1] This is the aspectual verb "use" here. It means that you repeatedly read long texts for some period in the past, but no longer do so.

[2] is ungrammatical. This "used" is not a verb but an adjective that requires a gerund-participial clause as complement as in [3], not an infinitival one. It means that you were familiar with reading long texts.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

She calls the "used" in "get used to" and "be used to" a verb, but it's actually an adjective.

Some teacher!