hi people, I can say that i don`t know how to use some words correctly in the english language, cause i`m not a native speaker of english and i need to know the difference and in wich context you use wanna or want
wanna is a contracted form of want a or want toused as a transcription of informal speech. It is not used in writing except as a transcription of the way the words were pronounced by the speaker.

Written:

I want a new car.

I want to get tickets for the concert.

If the speaker used the short form of the pronunciation, and it is important to note this pronunciation, this could be transcribed as

'I wanna new car.'
'I wanna get tickets fer the concert.'

wanna is not a real word in English. It's only used to show how people pronounce those words.

CJ
Thanks
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I'm a *** bad student, thank you very much for this answer.

"I wanna smoke now !"

It's stange, "wanna" can be used for pronunciation and not for written...why ? ^^

Other question, English and American is the same language ? If no what the differences ?

Thank you Emotion: wink
AnonymousIt's stange, "wanna" can be used for pronunciation and not for written...why ? ^^
As CJ has already explained, it is not a word; it is a phonetic transcription of a sound, just as 'Hoo-eee!' (a shout of exhilaration) is not a word, but a transcription of a sound. This also applies to gonna, hafta, oughtta, and other transcriptions you will meet in dialogue and at internet chat sites.
AnonymousEnglish and American is the same language ? If no what the differences ?
They are called British English and American English, and along with Australian. New Zealand, South African, Scottish, Singaporean and Indian Englishes (and a few more) are all the same languages. As you study them, you will meet the few minor differences, mostly in vocabulary.