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What is the difference in meaning between the following sentences?

1: If it will rain tomorrow, we will cancel the picnic.

2: If it rains tomorrow, we will cancel the picnic.
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Comments  
The correct structure is:

If it rains, we will cancel the picnic.

if clause , main clause.

Format: If+ subject (simple present), subject+simple future.

The first sentence cannot be correct,for it contains future forms in both the clauses.

Thanks
SoorisThe correct structure is:

If it rains, we will cancel the picnic.

if clause , main clause.

Format: If+ subject (simple present), subject+simple future.

The first sentence cannot be correct,for it contains future forms in both the clauses.


Sooris, are you sure?

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Jackson6612
SoorisThe correct structure is:

If it rains, we will cancel the picnic.

if clause , main clause.

Format: If+ subject (simple present), subject+simple future.

The first sentence cannot be correct,for it contains future forms in both the clauses.


Sooris, are you sure?

Jackson,

You should read up a little bit more on the "if" usage.

There are mainly 2 structures in Eng where “If” clauses are used, depending on the context, the results can vary. In the general sense and usage, the “if” clause implies a very good possibility that something will happen. In this case, the verb is used in the present tense.

i.e. John told me that he will be here. If you (will) see him, can you please tell him I am waiting for him at the canteen?

If you don’t clean your room, you are / will be grounded this weekend. - both are acceptable



Another “if” condition is the hypothetical type which is unlikely to happen. I.e. If I were his mother, I will never allow the kid to scream uncontrollably in a restaurant. But, I will never be the mother.



If it (will) rains tomorrow, the picnic is / will be cancelled. -both are correct.

If you don’t see me by 9 am tomorrow, don’t wait for me.



Both the sentences are wrong.

never use "will" where sentence starts with "if". we cant use if and will in same sentence.

The correct sentece should be-

If its rain tomorrow we cancel the picnic.
WE CAN USE "WILL" AFTER "IF" in certain structures!

If we are talking about future results rather than conditions, an if - will clause is used. So here is the first exception to the rule:

If (you think) it will save our marriage, I'll try to give up drinking.

I'll help to pay the course fees, if that will persuade you to apply to university.

Take the whole of next week off, if that will help you to recover.

if you will... = if you insist on...

This could be the second exception to the rule, but this use of will in the if-clause does not refer to future possibility, but instead has the same meaning as the verb insist on. In this usage a lot of word stress if placed upon will:

If you will smoke twenty a day, it's not surprising you have a hacking cough. =

If you insist on smoking so much, it's not surprising you have a hacking cough

If she will eat so many chocolates, it's hardly surprising she has a spotty face.

if you won't... = if you refuse to...

Similarly, the negative of will in the if-clause has the same meaning as refuse to. As you read these examples, remember to place heavier word stress than normal on won't:

If she won't come to Sardinia with us, there's nothing we can do to make her.

If she refuses to come to Sardinia with us, there's nothing we can do to make her.

What shall we do, if she won't agree to have the operation?

if you will / would = if you wouldn't mind...

This third exception to the rule doesn't have a conditional meaning either. This helps to explain why they are exceptions. Here we are using if + will or if + would as polite requests with the same meaning as if you wouldn't mind:

If you'll just fill in this form before you go, you can hand it in to reception. =

If you wouldn't mind filling in this form before you go, you can leave it with reception.

If you would take a seat, the doctor will see you in five minutes.

If you wouldn't mind taking a seat, the doctor will see you in five minutes.

If you'd be so kind as to take a seat, the consultant will see you in five minutes.
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AnonymousWE CAN USE "WILL" AFTER "IF" in certain structures!
Good list of exceptions. Emotion: smile

However, let's be clear that the example in the first post of this thread is not an exception.

CJ
The most interesting sentence for me is

If (you think) it will save our marriage, I'll try to give up drinking.

It is interesting that you inserted (you think). By the way, it is Present Simple and if we say

If you think it will save our marriage, I'll try to give up drinking.

it will be less exceptional than

If it will save our marriage, I'll try to give up drinking.

I am trying to find out more convincing arguments to back up the use of two FUTURES here.

Could you tell me what difference you would feel if asked to compare

If it will save our marriage, I'll try to give up drinking.

If it saves our marriage, I'll try to give up drinking.

As for my feeling, I can say that it seems to me the first one is more emotional and the most important is that

1) The only thing which can save the marriage is my quiting smoking.

2) Here it feels like if something else (not my giving up smoking) saves the marriage then I will give up smoking.

I might be comepletely wrong. But this is what I feel. Could you ascertain if my idea is close to the truth?
that was pretty comprehensive. thanks
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