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1) She worked in Company ABC.
2) She has worked in Company ABC.

What is the difference in the meaning of sentence 1) and 2)?
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Comments  
1) relates to the past. It states that a certain event happened in the past.
2) relates to the present. It says that she now has the experience of having worked for that company.

CJ
2) "She has worked in Company ABC."

-> relates to the present. It says that she now has the experience of having worked for that company.

Yea, I understand the meaning of this sentence you've written above and I also know that it has a bearing on the present. But you only imply with your explanation she hasn't been working for that company anymore. Cannot the sentence possibly indicate as well that she has been working for that company? How can I find out the real meaning of this sentence?

If I am not mistaken, in my opinion, it can have two possible meanings. -> The experience she has gained of having worked for that company (result) or it can indicate that she has been normally working for that company (for 1,2,3...years - just example).

Thanks a lot.
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MaroldIf I am not mistaken, in my opinion, it can have two possible meanings. -> The experience she has gained of having worked for that company (result) or it can indicate that she has been normally working for that company (for 1,2,3...years - just example).
Marold,

She worked for ABC during her internship - (before) ---------------------Worked: connotes past, done.

She has (not) worked there anymore since she graduated from Stanford. This negative perfect says: since her graduation up to the time of this statement, her relationship with ABC has been terminated.
Hi,

She has worked in Company ABC. First, please note that we do not normally include the word company here, and we usually work for . . . .
eg She has worked for IBM.

With the Present Perfect, much depends on the context.

Example 1
You say only Let me tell you about my friend Mary. She has worked for ABC.
To a native speaker, this sounds like she no longer works there.

Example 2

You say only Let me tell you about my friend Mary. She has worked for ABC for three years.
To a native speaker, this sounds like she still works there.

Clive
heloOO1) She worked for Company ABC.(You can regard this sentence as her past habit or she doesn't work for company anymore)
2) She has worked for Company ABC.(She has left working for company ABC)
If you want to imply that she works for the company,you can use "She has been working for company ABC"
This sentence actually implies that she has left just now or she is still working.
Thanks!
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MaroldCannot the sentence possibly indicate as well that she has been working for that company?
Not as an isolated sentence as it stands. To indicate that meaning, change to the progressive (-ing) or add a for phrase that says how long or both.

She has been working at ABC.
She has worked at ABC for three years.
She has been working at ABC for three years.
MaroldHow can I find out the real meaning of this sentence?
Oof! Meaning is use. Stay tuned to the English channel in your brain for the next five years and you'll begin to know the real meaning of it all. Emotion: smile

CJ
Thank you all guys.Emotion: smile
Thanks a lot, CJ. English is sometimes really confusing for me as a foreign language. Sometimes the present perfect and the present perfect continuous are interchangeable without any change of meaning. And sometimes, talking particularly about this instance, they imply something else. Emotion: smile

But I think I finally comprehended the difference. It also quite depends on the context.
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