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There are thousands of languages. It would be interesting to see examples of differences between English and your native language. I don't mean you should provide a complete list of them in one post, just some examples at a time. Your examples may be about vocabulary, morphology, grammar, syntax or anything really.
I'll begin by giving a couple of examples of how verbose English sometimes is compared with Finnish:
Hän maalasi talonsa. = He painted his house.
Hän maalautti talonsa. = He had his house painted.
Hän maalautteli taloaan. = He had his house painted frequently. (Finnish: 3 words, English: 6 words)

There is a verb for to paint: maalata;
to have [something] painted: maalauttaa

and to have [something] painted frequently: maalautella
and all of these behave grammatically like any other verb. In English one can manage with just one verb, to paint in all these situations.
The same is true about to fix, to have [something] fixed and to have [something] fixed frequently and so on.

Cheers
CB
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Comments  (Page 2) 
CalifJimAnything in the lyrics of songs that Elvis himself ever sang?
To the cross of Calvary
Mm, let it be my prayer, dear Lord, each day
To help me do the best I can
For there is no friend on whom I can depend
Blessed Jesus, hold my hand.


(Oh, I know he didn't write it, but he sang it, didn't he? Emotion: stick out tongue)
Tanit
For there is no friend on whom I can depend

(Oh, I know he didn't write it, but he sang it, didn't he? )
No, he didn't sing that song. I think Forbes's excellent you ain't nothing but a whom dog is the only instance of whomin Elvis songs.Emotion: smile
CB
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Finnish is extremely rich in compounds. This because all concepts are written as one word. Therefore all of these examples are compounds in Finnish: a collection of butterflies, a heap of sand, a bottle of beer, a department store, foreign policy, air force, labour permit, night train etc. Since countless nouns can be added after "a collection of" and after similar expressions, there is no limit to compounds and it would be impossible and pointless to try to include them in a dictionary.

Another convenient thing is that it is alwayspossible to form an adjective and a noun from a place name. There must be more than a million towns and villages in the world, which means that in the Finnish vocabulary there are more than a million words to denote people who live in these places. Even if a person has never heard the name of a foreign village, he knows what to call a person who lives there. English is extremely awkward in this respect. If you live in New York, you are a New Yorker. Those who live in London are Londoners, but those who live in Moscow are Muscovites and those who live in Grantham are Granthamians.Emotion: smile I wonder what to call anyone who lives in Uppsala or Kauniainen?
Cheers
CB
Cool Breeze Finnish is extremely rich in compounds. This because all concepts are written as one word.
Really? What's the Finnish word for the concept "still angry about how I lost my wallet yesterday"?
AlienvoordReally? What's the Finnish word for the concept "still angry about how I lost my wallet yesterday"?
Hmm... Emotion: smile Maybeconcept isn't the best word. Random House Webster's definition is "a general notion or idea" and I couldn't think of a better word to use. Perhaps you can help me? What would be a good word for what I described in my previous post?
Cheers
CB
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I would just say that Finnish is highly synthetic .
AlienvoordI would just say that Finnish is highly synthetic .
Yes, it is, but isn't there a word in English for what I described? Actually, I have wondered about this for as long as I have studied English. I have never seen a word I think suitable. Perhaps there isn't one. Well, never mind...
Cheers
CB
I'm not sure how to describe it other than "compounding is highly productive." I'm not sure why I would need to describe it any other way.
Anyway, department store, foreign policy, air force, labour permit, night train are compound words. They are written as two words, but they otherwise function as one word. So I don't think they're really different from compounds in German or Finnish (I know very little about Finnish, I'm just going by what you said).
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I think about albour permit etc. in exactly the same way as you and I understand why you wonder why you would need to describe words like that any other way. You don't! It's just that in Finnish there is a word for a "complete" concept or conception. I know now that these aren't the right words. I always had my doubts about them. The Finnish word is a noun. And we need not talk about compound words or compound nouns at all. For example a zebra is complete in itself as it is: I saw a zebra. However, I can also use it as part of a compound word: a zebra crossing: Pedestrians should use a zebra crossing to cross a street. In this sentence zebra on its own wouldn't be enough, wouldn't be complete. Crossing is also needed for the meaning to be understood.
In Finnish there is a word, a noun that covers both usages, and Finns can say that all ****s that consist of more than one word are written as compounds. I don't know what English noun to insert where **** is. That is theword I am looking for.Emotion: smile I am beginning to think there is no such word! That would in no way be exceptional. In the world's thousands of languages there are countless examples of that. It is a fallacy to think that all words of a language have a counterpart in all other languages. No way. And no language is the worse for that becauseall languages are deficient in this respect.
CB
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