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There are thousands of languages. It would be interesting to see examples of differences between English and your native language. I don't mean you should provide a complete list of them in one post, just some examples at a time. Your examples may be about vocabulary, morphology, grammar, syntax or anything really.
I'll begin by giving a couple of examples of how verbose English sometimes is compared with Finnish:
Hän maalasi talonsa. = He painted his house.
Hän maalautti talonsa. = He had his house painted.
Hän maalautteli taloaan. = He had his house painted frequently. (Finnish: 3 words, English: 6 words)

There is a verb for to paint: maalata;
to have [something] painted: maalauttaa

and to have [something] painted frequently: maalautella
and all of these behave grammatically like any other verb. In English one can manage with just one verb, to paint in all these situations.
The same is true about to fix, to have [something] fixed and to have [something] fixed frequently and so on.

Cheers
CB
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Comments  (Page 3) 
I see what you mean. That sounds interesting - what is the Finnish word, and what is its derivation?
I see what you mean. That sounds interesting - what is the Finnish word? Do you know its derivation?
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Alienvoord I see what you mean. That sounds interesting - what is the Finnish word? Do you know its derivation?

The word is käsite. Actually zebra crossing isn't a very good example because the word is usually applied to abstract things. Main principle would be a better example. In Finnish it's a compound. I am pretty sure käsite is derived from käsi (= a hand) and a verb käsittää. Centuries ago the verb had a rather concrete meaning: "to touch and feel with hands". When one did that, one got an idea about the shape and size of an object. Over time the meaning changed and became more abstract. These days the verb has lost its original meaning completely and it now means "to understand".

I wish people living in the Far East would give examples of differences between English and their native languages as I know very little about them.

CB
All the online Finnish-English dictionaries gloss käsite as "concept". I guess you would disagree with that.
AlienvoordAll the online Finnish-English dictionaries gloss käsite as "concept". I guess you would disagree with that.
I don't know whether I should agree or disagree. You (among others over the years) have given me reason to think it's not a very good word in all contexts. If I can use concept in the contexts I have described in my previous posts, the word is fine.
CB
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CalifJimI speak American English, and, in contrast to "English", I never use the words shall, may, ought, or whom.

might is pp of may? 'might' I keep hearing all the time?
There are fewer prepositions in Finnish than in English. Quite often, it is possible to place a preposition before or after the word it modifies. If the preposition is after the noun, it is called a postposition. After all, it is after the word it modifies. (Latin post = after) The noun is in the genitive in these cases:
Kävelin yli kadun. / Kävelin kadun yli. (= I walked across the street.)

CB
Word order is fairly free in Finnish. However, people don't put words in just any order. Some collocations usually occur in poems and lyrics of songs only. Let's take an English sentence as an example: Spring has come again. In Finnish the four words - there are four words in Finnish as well - can be in any order. Changing the word order never produces a question in Finnish. I think that only about six or seven of the possible combinations are actually normally used. No word order is ungrammatical, though, and therefore the words may occur in any order in a poem.
If I use the English word order, the sentence is: Kevät on tullut taas.
CB
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