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1.Combine each set of simple sentences below to produce the kind of sentence specified in parentheses. 1) People begin to recycle. They generate much less trash. (Complex.) <No idea, but TIP: Using subordinating conjunctions!> 2) Environmentalists have hope. Perhaps more communities will recycle newspaper and glass. Many citizens refuse to participate. (Compound-complex.) <No idea>

2. What is Grammar and style checkers?

3. If the verb consists of only one word and is not a form of 'be', start the question with a form of of 'do' and use the plain form of the verb. What is the plain form of a verb? Is that like " begin, start" , not: began, started; has begun...

4. A compound construction combines words that are closely related and equally important. It makes writing clearer and more economical because it pulls together linked information. 1) What does "economical" here mean? 2) " It pulls together linked information", Is the word: linked here a participle, it modifies information? like an adjective?

Thanks for replying!
Comments  
Anonymous1.Combine each set of simple sentences below to produce the kind of sentence specified in parentheses. 1) People begin to recycle. They generate much less trash. (Complex.) <No idea, but TIP: Using subordinating conjunctions!> 2) Environmentalists have hope. Perhaps more communities will recycle newspaper and glass. Many citizens refuse to participate. (Compound-complex.) <No idea>

2. What is Grammar and style checkers?

3. If the verb consists of only one word and is not a form of 'be', start the question with a form of of 'do' and use the plain form of the verb. What is the plain form of a verb? Is that like " begin, start" , not: began, started; has begun...

4. A compound construction combines words that are closely related and equally important. It makes writing clearer and more economical because it pulls together linked information. 1) What does "economical" here mean? 2) " It pulls together linked information", Is the word: linked here a participle, it modifies information? like an adjective?

Thanks for replying!

Hi,

I’ll try! I think you need to review a good grammar book or ask your teacher for some help. I wanted to review subordinating conjunctions, so I looked at a book I like (The One-Minute Grammarian by Morton S. Freeman, Penguin Books, 1992). There may be a later version of this book.

1.Combine each set of simple sentences below to produce the kind of sentence specified in parentheses. 1) People begin to recycle. They generate much less trash. (Complex.) <No idea, but TIP: Using subordinating conjunctions!>

1. According my book, a subordinating clause is

a group of words that has a subject and a predicate but cannot stand alone because it does not constitute a complete sentence. (On its own, it is not a complete sentence.)

Subordinating conjunctions INTRODUCE (start, begin) subordinating clauses.

Some examples of words that can be subordinating conjunctions:

after, although, as, because, before, even though, except, if, since, so that, than, that, though, unless, until, when, where, whether, while

I think you could say something like

When people begin to recycle, they generate much less trash.

After people begin to recycle, they generate much less trash.

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2) Environmentalists have hope. Perhaps more communities will recycle newspaper and glass. Many citizens refuse to participate. (Compound-complex.) <No idea>

Although many citizens refuse to participate, environmentalists have hope (or "hope" instead of "have hope") that more communities will recycle newspaper and more communities will recycle glass. This seems somewhat awkward and long to me, but I think it is a compound-complex sentence!)

If I were to use the words without worrying about the type of sentence, I’d just say

Although many citizens refuse to participate, environmentalists hope that more communities will recycle newspaper and glass.

or

Environmentalists hope that more communities will recycle newspaper and glass, even though many citizens refuse to participate.

I looked at another book for this question. (Mosaic: A Content-Based Grammar by Patricia K. Werner).

Compound sentences are two simple sentences joined (connected by) a conjunction (and sometimes by a comma, also)

Some common conjunctions: and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet

Examples of compound sentences:

I like coffee and I like tea. ("I like coffee and tea" is NOT a compound sentence.)

They play baseball and they play basketball. ("They play basketball and baseball" is NOT a compound sentence.)

She makes cookies, but her daughter makes cakes.

He studies English, but he wants to study French.

Complex sentences have two or more clauses joined by connecting words (like after, although, because, that, who...) One clause is independent. The sentence also has one or more dependent clauses introduced by a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun.

Example:

Although she was sick, she did well on the test.

(This uses a subordinating conjunction.)

A compound-complex sentence combines the characteristics of both types of sentences.

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2. What is Grammar and style checkers?

They are software programs that will compare what you’ve written against a standard of what is (programmed as being) correct grammar and correct style. Then they will show you where you have done something that doesn't follow their guidelines. My MS Word program has a grammar checker. I like the spelling checker a lot. I’d probably like the grammar checker a lot better if English weren’t my first language. I’d like to have a good grammar check for Spanish.

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3. If the verb consists of only one word and is not a form of 'be', start the question with a form of of 'do' and use the plain form of the verb. What is the plain form of a verb? Is that like " begin, start" , not: began, started; has begun...

I'm not sure about the plain form of a verb. But it is easy to use do or does to start a question. Examples:

Do you swim?

Does he start tomorrow?

Does she work at home?

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4. A compound construction combines words that are closely related and equally important. It makes writing clearer and more economical because it pulls together linked information. 1) What does "economical" here mean? 2) " It pulls together linked information", Is the word: linked here a participle, it modifies information? like an adjective?

Here, "economical" means being able to express the same idea in fewer words, to express the same idea in a shorter way. (You "spend" or use fewer words.) Yes, as it is used here, "linked" is a participle, a verb form acting as an adjective describing "information". Think of conjunctions and relative pronouns (that, who, whose, which, etc.) as links.



Thank you, Nef. Your answers are really good. And I am the person who posted. Actually, I am reading the grammar book recently. So these questions are from that grammar book.
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