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Hello Guy!
I want to know: Is Appositive sentence the same as Non-essential clauses ?
Little confusion in recognizing Direct and in Direct objecs, also object of preposition
We both thought that this novel was one of the finest books we have ever read.
I read that direct object recives the action. Here book get the action "read" which make its a direct object. But preposition Of make me confuse. Whether its a object of preposition or not. Secondly is ONE is direct object here ?
Please clarify this point Emotion: smile
Thanks!
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Cute572 We both thought that this novel was one of the finest books we have ever read.
I read that direct object recives the action. Here book get the action "read" which make its a direct object. But preposition Of make me confuse. Whether its a object of preposition or not. Secondly is ONE is direct object here ?I think of direct and indirect objects in connection with transitive verbs (action verbs - doing something to somebody). Your example uses a "verb of being," "to be" (something is something). The "that" clause has no direct or indirect object.
Novel was one. The subject of the clause is "Novel," and the verb is "was." There's no action, so there's no object. In the 40's we used to call "one" the "predicate nominative," but now I guess they call it the "verb compliment."

"Books" is object of the preposition, as you suspect, not object of the verb (where we would use direct/indirect). The prepositional phrase modifies "one."

"We have ever read" is a clause, modifying "books." I can understand why you think "books" might be object of the verb "read," and I'm not sure how to explain why it's not.

To back way up, if you're looking for a true action verb that functions as a true action verb, you'll find it in the main clause, We thought. It's intransitive, so it has a direct object but no indirect object. The direct object is the "that" clause. (What did we both think??)
HuevosIt gives me pleasure to introduce you to Paul. It = subject; "to introduce you to Paul" = direct object; (to) me = indirect object.
Cute572 Could you please explain why "to introduce you to Paul" is direct object and not object of preposition ? As its starts with preposition
"To" is not a preposition here. It's part of the infinitive form of the verb, "to introduce." "To introduce you to Paul" is an infinitive phrase acting as a noun, not a prepositional phrase.

Best wishes, - A.
Comments  
Cute572Little confusion in recognizing Direct and in Direct objecs
She kissed him. She = subject; him = direct object.
She did it to him. She = subject; it = direct object; (to) him = indirect object.
It gives me pleasure to introduce you to Paul. It = subject; "to introduce you to Paul" = direct object; (to) me = indirect object.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks Huevos for replying Emotion: smile
Could you please explain why "to introduce you to Paul" is direct object and not object of preposition ?
As its starts with preposition
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