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Transitive verbs require a direct object. We can find the direct object of a verb by reading the verb and then asking "what?" (or "whom?").

You should ask for advice. (for what? Advice) is ask here a transitive verb?

You have to ask permission to leave. (for what? permission) transitive?

There is no need to ask. Is ask here intrasitive?

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anonymousYou should ask for advice. (for what? Advice) is ask here a transitive verb?.

Preposition phrases cannot function as object of a verb. "Advice" is complement of the preposition "for", and the whole PP "for advice" is complement of "ask", not a direct object.

anonymousYou have to ask permission to leave. (for what? permission) transitive?

I think it is reasonable to say that even though "permission" is an abstract noun, it is still direct object of "ask"; so yes, it is transitive.

anonymousThere is no need to ask. Is ask here intrasitive?

Yes, although there may be an unexpressed object here (cf. There is no need to ask Ed), it is still intransitive.



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anonymousYou should ask for advice. (for what? Advice) is ask here a transitive verb?

No, 'advice' is object of the preposition 'for', and the preposition phrase 'for advice' is complement of the verb 'ask'.

But:

You should ask his advice.

In this case, 'his advice' is direct object of the verb 'ask'.

anonymousYou have to ask permission to leave. (for what? permission (to leave)) transitive?

Yes, I'd you could take the whole noun phrase 'permission to leave' as object.

anonymousThere is no need to ask. Is ask here intransitive?

Yes.

I think this thread can conceivably answer some of your relevant questions ahead.

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Comments  

You don't ask permission, you ask "for permission". Even if the for is omitted, it is implied so I think the answer is the same as the answer for "for advice".

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panda chalk 817You don't ask permission,

I do. It's perfectly acceptable.