I have trouble understanding say and tell which direct speach, indirect speach and
reported speach are used. Help, what is the difference. I need examples.
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If I understand what you are asking, direct speech quotes a speaker's exact words - e.g. He said, "Don't do that!"

Indirect is when someone says what someone else said without esactly quoting the exact words - e.g. He said not to do that - or He said I shouldn't do that.

I am not sure what you mean by reported speech. If it's saying what someone else said, the first example covers that. If it's a quote within a quote, you follow the first rule, but you use single quotation marks - e.g. "He said, 'Don't do that!'"

I hope this helps.
Reported speech is the same as indirect speech.
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i dont know when i have to use direct and indirect speech obviusly i dont understand difference
Hello, Guest
This may help you:
When you write, direct speech is when you use quotation marks " ... "
A: "John! Where is Mum?"
J: "I don't know"

Indirect/reported speech is when you use "said/says that/ asks/asked (etc)" instead of quotation marks. There are no quotation marks in reported speech.
A asked John where his mum was.
John replied he didn't know.
The most general rules you'll find useful for now are these:

Use direct speech when writing a story.
Use indirect speech when having a conversation.

I hope that helps.

CJ
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I don't want to post a new topic for a question so I'm asking here. I'd be really happy if you could answer it:

'She said: "It's no use telling a child to be as you want if you aren't a good example to him."'

Now, how can this sentence be changed to reported speech?

Thank you all.
Hi,
'She said: "It's no use telling a child to be as you want if you aren't a good example to him."'

'She said it was no use telling a child to be as you wanted if you weren't a good example to him.'

'You' is used in a generalized way, but it can be avoided by saying 'one', which is more formal English.

'She said it was no use telling a child to be as one wanted if one weren't a good example to him.'

Best wishes,
Clive
Clive, thank you very much!
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