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Hi,

Say there is a bank and it is on Oak Street across from a library. Can you also say "it is on Oak Street across the library"? I am just wondering why "from" is needed after the "across" i.e. across from. For example, "a boy is walking across the road" but it's not "the boy is walking across from the road". Because as far as I know, you don't say like "it is on Oak Street opposite from the library". Instead, you say "it is on Oak Street opposite the library".

By the way, can you also say, "it is on oak street cross the library"?

Thanks in advance.
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X (the library, the gate, the prison, England, Spain) is across the street (the road, the courtyard, the border, the English Channel, the sea) from Y (the bank, the palace, the railroad station, France, The United States.)

You can say "the bank is on Oak street across from the library" but not "across the library" or "cross the library". I think you can say either "the bank is on Oak Strreet opposite the library" or "opposite from the library" but I'm less sure about this one.
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I also vote for X is opposite Y, no preposition in this case.
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Khoff I think you can say either "the bank is on Oak Strreet opposite the library" or "opposite from the library" but I'm less sure about this one.

I would say either 'across from' or 'opposite', but not 'opposite from'.
how about '' opposite to ''?
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Green89how about '' opposite to ''?
I've never heard it.

In cases of abstraction, one might say that his ideas are "in opposition to" mine.
 pieanne's reply was promoted to an answer.