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Which would you say? and is the sentence coherent?

1 When riding double on a moped, the person behind needs to turn his body in the direction that the driver is turning (in) so as not to make a counterweight by turning your body in the opposite direction.
2 When riding double on a moped, the person behind needs to turn his body in the direction in which the driver is turning.

How come in the first sentence the IN at the end of the sentence, in my opinion doesn't need to be there and in the second sentence there are 2 INs.

Which would one say? are they both correct and can you say MAKE A COUNTERWEIGHT? How would you say it?

Thank you
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Hi Alc

Both sentences are a bit awkward. I would suggest rewording -- something like this:

- When riding double on a moped, the passenger needs to lean in the same direction the driver is turning. (Leaning in the opposite direction would produce a counterweight.)
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alc24That sounds much better thank you.

But if you were to use the structure

"in the direction in which you are turning" here you see 2 INs

but in

" in the direction that you are turning (in)" here the IN is optional, is it ? or do you leave it?

and can you say "makes a counterweight" how would you say what I'm trying to express?

thank you Yankee

Optional.

Yankee answered the "counterweight" part.

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Comments  
That sounds much better thank you.

But if you were to use the structure

"in the direction in which you are turning" here you see 2 INs
but in
" in the direction that you are turning (in)" here the IN is optional, is it ? or do you leave it?

and can you say "makes a counterweight" how would you say what I'm trying to express?

thank you Yankee
 Philip's reply was promoted to an answer.
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