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Everyone would disagree to help the criminals..

I wonder whether "disagree to help" is correct English.

I've looked up "disagree" in dictionaries, but I couldn't find "disagree" can be used with to-infinitive, like "agree"

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fire1

Everyone would disagree to help the criminals..

I wonder whether "disagree to help" is correct English.

I've looked up "disagree" in dictionaries, but I couldn't find "disagree" can be used with to-infinitive, like "agree"

In a sentence like that, no, it can't. In such a sentence, if someone didn't agree to do something we'd normally say they refused, or perhaps declined, to do it.

Everyone would refuse to help the criminals.

Disagree can be followed by a to-infinitive in a sentence like I expect people who disagree to explain their reasons, but this is a different construction.

Your original sentence isn't completely wrong, though it's a little odd. It would mean that people would intentionally disagree with each other in order to help the criminals.

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"People would intentionally disagree with each other in order to help the criminals"

Sir, I would like to ask about one question regarding the above sentence. Kindly tell me "Disagree with one another" or "Disagree with each other" is grammattically correct.

Thank you.

cat navy 425Sir, I would like to ask about one question regarding the above sentence. Kindly tell me if "Disagree with one another" or "Disagree with each other" are grammattically grammatically correct.

You can use either one.

Thanks a lot.
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