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The below is from a book, Man's Search for Meaning.

In the paragraph, "disappointed" seems a bit odd.

To me "disappointing" seems much better.

So I checked out Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.

After the checkup, I am more confident about my suggestion.

What do you think?

The rumors about the military situation were usually contradictory. They followed one another rapidly and succeeded only in making a contribution to the war of nerves that was waged in the minds of all the prisoners. Many times, hopes for a speedy end to the war, which had been fanned by optimistic rumors, were disappointed. Some men lost all hope, but it was the incorrigible optimists who were the most irritating companions.

disappointed adjective

unhappy because something you hoped for did not happen, or because someone or something was not as good as you expected:

▪ Dad seemed more disappointed than angry.

▪ disappointed customers

▪ Local residents were disappointed with the decision.

▪ I was disappointed that we played so well yet still lost.

▪ I'm very disappointed in you.

▪ The girl's parents were bitterly disappointed at the jury's verdict.

▪ Visitors were disappointed to find the museum closed.

disappointing adjective

not as good as you hoped or expected:

disappointing profit figures

▪ The Lakers' loss in the playoffs was very disappointing.
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Stenka25Many times, hopes for a speedy end to the war, which had been fanned by optimistic rumors, were disappointed.
The subject of that sentence is HOPES, specifically HOPES for a speedy end to the war. The prisoners are hoping that the war will end soon, and they hear rumours which RAISE their hopes, i.e. make them think the war is more likely to end soon. But the rumours were too optimistic, and the war doesn't end, and this DASHES those hopes.

The author has used DISAPPOINTED instead of DASHED or CRUSHED. Strictly speaking, a HOPE or WISH cannot be DISAPPOINTED, because only a sentient creature can be DISAPPOINTED, but the usage is figurative. Imagine the HOPE as being a person. The hope is raised by all of these rumours, then it is DISAPPOINTED because the war keeps going. That's what the author was trying to say.

I would have used DASHED instead of DISAPPOINTED.

KrisBlueNZ
Comments  
I think disappointed here means suppressed according to the context.

Many times, hopes for a speedy end to the war, which had been fanned by optimistic rumors, were suppressed.

Hopes were suppressed at the time; therefore some men lost all hope...

Good luck!
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 KrisBlueNZ's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thanks a lot, KrisBlueNZ.