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Hi

I recently watched Hedy Lamarr's film 'Dishonored Lady'. I thought flitted through my mind that in recent years the movie would have been titled 'Disgraced Lady'. I assume that both words are synonymous and interchangeable.

Google N-grams result says this.

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=26&smoothing=3&content=dishonored+woman%2C+disgraced+woman&year_end=2019&year_start=1800&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cdishonored%20woman%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cdisgraced%20woman%3B%2Cc0

Could I request your take please?

Dishonored vs Disgraced

Thanks,

Tom

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I'm sure you have compared the dictionary meanings of these words.

Here is just my quick reaction to them.

Disgraced lady - She herself did something bad.

Dishonoured lady - Someone did something bad to her.


I haven't seen the movie, but I read that the title 'The Sins Of Madeleine' was originally considered, which makes me think she herself did bad things and caused herself problems. . What do you think?

Clive

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Mr. TomI The thought flitted through my mind that in recent years that the movie would have been titled 'Disgraced Lady'.

Strange thought. Maybe even presumptuous? What if I said that I thought that Shakespeare's Julius Caesar would have been titled Assassination in Ancient Rome?

Mr. TomI assume that both words are synonymous and interchangeable.

I only checked WordNet's quick definitions, but both of those words were defined exactly the same: suffering shame.

Mr. TomCould I request your take please?

Given that the words are essentially synonymous, I don't see any reason to question what was basically a throw of the dice.

CJ

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Comments  

Thanks, Clive.

--and yes, you are very right about the title of the film. It was originally considered 'The Sins of Madeleine' because throughout the film, she kept causing herself trouble through her silly actions.

My questions is, shouldn't the real title have been "The Disgraced Lady' instead of 'The Dishonored Lady'?

Tom

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Mr. TomI assume that both those words are synonymous and interchangeable.

By the way, both is not appropriate. (Picky point.)

It means

I assume that 'dishonored' is a synonym and interchangeable, and that 'disgraced' is a synonym and interchangeable.

Neither word on its own can be a synonym or interchangeable.

CJ

My questions is, shouldn't the real title have been "The Disgraced Lady' instead of 'The Dishonored Lady'?

Yes, I agree.


I should add that today I hear the word disgrace much, much more than I hear dishonour. In modern English culture, we just don't seem to consider honour/ dishonour as much as people used to.

Clive

Yes, but the film came out in 1947, and according to the Ngram results, both words were being used with about the same frequency at the time.

I really do take exception to this talk of "the real title". What does that even mean? Now that everything is "fake news" do we really need "fake titles" too?

Emotion: angry

Emotion: rofl

CJ

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CalifJim
Mr. TomI The thought flitted through my mind that in recent years that the movie would have been titled 'Disgraced Lady'.
Thanks a lot, CJ.
Could you please tell me about the use of the red 'that' in the sentence above? Does the sentence sound wrong/odd without it?
Tom

I read it too fast and missed the first 'that'. Emotion: embarrassed

Ignore that in my reply.

CJ