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Hello All,



I’m confused when using “dislike”. Would you please help me?



1) “I dislike apples.” If you have the same feeling, the answer should be “Neither do I” or “So do I”.



2) “Do you dislike apples?”

“Yes, I do. (“I dislike apples” or “I like apples”) or

“No, I don’t. (“I don’t like apples.” or “I don’t dislike apples.”)



Thanks!!
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A-fang “I dislike apples.” If you have the same feeling, the answer should be “Neither do I” or “So do I”.
So do I.
A-fang “Do you dislike apples?”

“Yes, I do. (“I dislike apples” or “I like apples”) or

“No, I don’t. (“I don’t like apples.” or “I don’t dislike apples.”)
Yes, I do means I dislike them.
No, I don't means I don't dislike them.

do and don't refer to the original verb dislike. Nobody used the verb like, so you can't change to the verb like in the middle of your answer!

CJ
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I'm confused when using "dislike". Would you please help me?

1) "I dislike apples." If you have the same feeling, the answer should be "Neither do I" or "So do I".

Neither is usually used with nor as in "neither A nor B," and would confuse people.
So do I, Me to, or I agree would all work.

2) "Do you dislike apples?"
"Yes, I do. ("I dislike apples" or "I like apples") or
All the above work, and you could just say "Yes."

"No, I don't. ("I don't like apples." or "I don't dislike apples.")

Your best bet here is to either agree or state your preference. It is logically correct to try to negate what the person said, but it is apt to cause confusion.

I don't like apples, I do like apples, Yes, I agree, all work.

Thanks!!
Thank you very much, CJ.