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Can we say"dislike to do"? Thanks.
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Comments  (Page 4) 
"Toda la vida es sueño, y los sueños, sueños son".

It's really a nonsense phrase. I took it from a medieval lyric by a Spanish gypsy.
"All the life is a mere dream, and dreams are nothing but dreams, (then...)".

Have a nice Monday!

paco
To senthilvelann,

How about,

"Baby "A" is crying again, as usual!"

"I wonder why baby "B" is crying now."
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senthilvelann -- the way to distinguish between the habits of the two babies is to use additional words; you can't do it just by your choice of the gerund or infinitive. The dirfference between "the baby started crying" and "the baby started to cry" tells me nothing about whether the baby is a habitual crier, whether it is a boy or girl, or whether it resembles the mother or the father! Obviously a distinction can be made between habitual action and occasional action, but this is not the way to do it, at least not in any version of English familiar to me.

As I said in an earlier post, there are some cases where you would choose one form rather than the other. But with most verbs, where you could choose either form, the average native listener will not recognize any difference in meaning between the two forms. I'm sorry if the grammar books suggest otherwise. I can only tell you what I would say and how I would understand these sentences if I heard them.

Other native speakers - help me out here!! Is there really some important distinction between "the baby started crying" and "the baby started to cry" that has totally escaped me for 50 years?? Am I giving bad advice? Someone please -- either back me up or set me straight!

(Ms.) Khoff
Re: Is there really some important distinction between "the baby started crying" and "the baby started to cry"

I am NOT a native English speaker but from my many years of experience in reading and writing English and also talking to native speakers(almost everyday), I can safely say that there is NO DISTINCTION between "the baby started crying" and "the baby started to cry".
Is there really some important distinction between "the baby started crying" and "the baby started to cry" that has totally escaped me for 50 years?

Looking at the two sentences 'cold', it's difficult to detect a difference.

But I'm willing to bet that if you or I (or anyone else) monitored the contexts in which we came across 'start + gerund' and 'start + infinitive' in our everyday lives, we'd find a pattern.

MrP
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Hello Khoff and MrP

I'd like to confirm if you feel completely zero, zip, zilch about the difference. What do you think about the native speaker's opinion that I wrote in the previous posting?

paco
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I would be more inclined to say that 'started crying' puts more emphasis on the process of crying. But I think I had better listen out for the structure for a few days; it's usually at this point in a thread that I start to imagine doubtful distinctions!

(Why the infinitive there, for instance: 'start to imagine'? 'Start imagining' would have brought the action too much to the fore, perhaps.)

MrP
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