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Hi,

1) I am aware that 'do a great disservice to someone' means to do something that will make the other person look bad. What if a friend of mine showed up to a party, even though she'd be ill and I'd catch a cold from her?

In my language, we have the same phrase as 'do a great disservice to someone' and it could be used in this example. (You did something (coming to a party while being ill) which caused problems to other people (me catching a cold). I'm afraid that 'do a great disservice' would probably not work here as English is a lot different than my mother tongue. Is there a similar phrase I could use?

2) Can I say that a function (in maths) is cluttered or crammed with a lot of expressions if it's comprised of square roots, absolute values, different powers etc. (it's very long and complicated)?

3) Is there a difference between 'phlegm' and 'mucus'?

If I have a runny nose, is the 'fluid' called 'phlegm' or 'mucus'? What about if I cough? Do I have a lot 'phlegm' or 'mucus' hanging around in the back of my throat?

Thank you! I always appreciate your help.

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Ann2251) I am aware that 'do a great disservice to someone' means to do something that will make the other person look bad.

You can use it if someone gives you a cold. They did not serve you well, did they?

But is seems rather formal or maybe joking to say that.

Ann2252) Can I say that a function (in maths) is cluttered or crammed

No, its just a complicated formula or expression.

Ann225If I have a runny nose, is the 'fluid' called 'phlegm' or 'mucus'?

The way I use it:

Mucus in your nasal passages, phlegm in your lungs and throat.

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Thank you. What could I use instead of ‘do a great disservice to’ to sound less formal?

Why is ‘crammed with or cluttered with’ wrong in this example? Is there a similar word I could use to convey the same meaning (except for ‘to be full of’)?

Ann225Why is ‘crammed with or cluttered with’ wrong in this example?

That is not the wording a mathematician would use.
It would be someone who has no understanding of math and just sees a jumble of symbols, letters and numbers.

Ann225What could I use instead of ‘do a great disservice to’ to sound less formal?

She's not thinking about others, even her friends, when she shows up to a party hacking and coughing.

The thing is that I’m not a mathematician. Would it still be considered wrong if I used that?

I’m sure that there’s a way to describe it. What about ‘loaded with’?

I’m sorry if I’m being too persistent, but I really want to get to the bottom of it.

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Ann225Would it still be considered wrong if I used that?

No, but people would assume that you are not good at math, and maybe a bit intimidated by it.

I’ll bear that in mind. Thank you.
Ann2253) Is there a difference between 'phlegm' and 'mucus'?

It is the difference between mentioning something in general and something in particular. The second word is for wherever it occurs in the body, including the bowels. The first word is for when it occurs in the throat.

Ann225If I have a runny nose, is the 'fluid' called 'phlegm' or 'mucus'?

In the UK it is generally referred to as snot. In medical jargon it would be referred to as mucus and that it was in a patient's nose.

Ann225Do I have a lot 'phlegm' or 'mucus' hanging around in the back of my throat?

In general, it would be referred to as phlegm. Doctors and medical texts would say mucus and that it was in a patient's throat.


Another point is that the red part is wordy. You could just write in my throat.

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