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How can I recognize which verb is ditransitive and which verb is monotransitive ?

thanks
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Comments  (Page 2) 
YankeeWouldn't that depend on the definition of the word 'give'?

Cows give milk. = monotransitive
[And I don't give a hoot.]

Seriously! I'm glad this discussion came up, because I, like Clive, hadn't heard the terms before.
Monotransitive verbs are followed by a) direct object, b) prepositional object, c) predicator complement ... find the way, deal with the topic, it costs 2 pounds ...
Ditransitive verbs are followed by a) indirect object and direct object (give me the letter), b) direct object and predicator complement (it costs us a lot of money) ...
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YankeeWouldn't that depend on the definition of the word 'give'?

Cows give milk. = monotransitive

And "I don't give a damn/darn/hoot.
If a verb is followed by a direct object only it is monotransitive if it is followed by two objects, direct and indirect, or an object and a complement it is called ditransitive
PhilipAnd "I don't give a damn/darn/hoot.
That's the second time you've commented on the cow-giving-milk sentence, Philip. What gives?
Emotion: wink

(By the way, do people also use the phrase "a good gosh darn" in your neck of the woods?)
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well the thing is that a verb is transitive because it requiere obligatory complementation.... that means that needs to be followed by some other syntactic elements.... and according to this type of complementation transitive verbs are subdivided into 3:
* monotransitive: which need only one object as a complementation... direct or indirect
*ditransitive: which requires both type of objects.... oi+od
*complex transitive: which requires two different type of complementation:
1-direct object + object complement
2-direct object + adverbial
if you need any more information just ask..... im studing this subject in the university!!! Emotion: stick out tongue
Hi do you have any further information that can help me with recognizing the differences between these complemetaions and intransitive ...maybe recommending some books or further readings. ? I am studying the subject in uni. too
AnonymousHi do you have any further information that can help me with recognizing the differences between these complemetaions and intransitive ...maybe recommending some books or further readings. ? I am studying the subject in uni. too
It's actually very simple. A monotransitive clause has one object. A ditransitive clause has two objects, indirect and direct:

"We sold our house". (monotransitive - one object only)
"We gave them some food". (ditransitive - two objects: "them" is indirect object; "some food" is direct object)

BillJ
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The sentence "I bought a cat for my son." can also be written as "I bought my son a cat." So, it is a ditransitive verb. Emotion: smile
-AK
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