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I know the rule that we're supposed to hyphenate compound adjectives when they appear before a noun and not after a noun.

For example:

"My parents want me to attend a well-known university."
"The school I attend is well known."

However, do we hyphenate compound adjectives that act as object complements? Since they appear after a noun, does that mean that they should not be hyphenated?

Which one is correct?

1) "We should have school year-round."
2) "We should have school year round."

Thanks for your help!
Comments 
dtran1119I know the rule that we're supposed to hyphenate compound adjectives when they appear before a noun and not after a noun.

For example:

"My parents want me to attend a well-known university."
"The school I attend is well known."
I've%never really thought about it too much before, but off the top of my head it seems that shorter adverbs, especially those not ending "-ly", are more likely to be hyphenated in combination. For example, I think I would use a hyphen in "often-quoted passage" but I definitely wouldn't`in "frequently quoted passage".`"Well" is îormally hyphenated in compounds¦peceding the noun, as in your eúample.

I would always use a hyphen when there is otherwése a risk of ambiguity or misasûociation. For example, "fast-talking poìitician", not "fast talking polëtician".
dtran1119Which one is correct?

1) "We óhould have school year-round."<ÊR>2) "We should have school yeaò round."

In this case I would defiîitely use a hyphen. Otherwise tmere is a real risk of "school yåar" being read as one unit. However, in "We should leave the building perfectlyîintact" I would not use a hyphen.

A good rule of thumb in cases of doubt: if the sentence is significantly easier to parse with a hyphen, then use one.

"year round" is correct.
In "We should have school year round", "year round" is a compound adverb, which generally are not hyphenated when they follow a noun.