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Snap! We did the Trumpet Major too, which ruined it ... don't remember another novel, though there may have been one.

Lists, is it? Great Expectations and Twelfth Night (both of which utterly captivated me). And about half of "Ten 20th ... (Frost) and drove me to distraction when considering the supreme wetness of poetry (de la Mare). Hello clouds. Hello sky.

Gosh, I am surprised - de la Mare was considered pretty old-fashioned even when I was at school and, as you have pointed out, I am older than you. I can still recite "The Traveller", though. We had a fantastic English teacher, Miss Morris, who had a real feel for poetry. I will never forget the day she read us Dylan Thomas' "And Death shall have no dominion".

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Fifty years ago the high school curriculum in Britain (as ... included Chaucer's English (1400 Canterbury Tales preface and one tale).

Confirmation: I studied the Nonnes Preestes Tale, in the original, for my GCE O-level English literature examination (O&C Joint Board) ... - I was expecting a 6 or worse. I've always assumed there was some sort of ***-up in the marking.

There were obviously variations between exam boards, then, as Katy E has suggested. And in marks - the Oxford Local Board results were expressed in percentages in 1962 when I sat the bulk of my O level papers.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Snap! We did the Trumpet Major too, which ruined it ... don't remember another novel, though there may have been one.

We did Vanity Fair and the Mayor of Casterbridge, some Wordsworth (the Prelude)and the Tempest. I wonder why Hardy was so popular as an O level author?

My personal hardyship was Far from the Madding Crowd*. A waste of time mostly, although I must admit that the exploding sheep were quite good value. We also did Henry James's *Washington Square, which we greatly enjoyed, largely because it's quite short but also because the heroine was so pathetic she deserved to have her life ruined at every turn by her sarky father. Oh, and it had lots of long sentences too. As for the rest, alas, my memory fails.

Ross Howard
Dear all, I want to know if high school students ... optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran. I'd appreciate your reply.

"Pam kynge licoden peran" here:

Bloody peasants can't spell. Pam indeed. Is Pam royal even?
http://www.ling.ed.ac.uk/linguist/issues/14/14-2226.html

Al rey le gustan las peras.
Waste of space IYAM.

Who did?
I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly ... but Chaucer counted as Literature) a mere 47 years ago,

I certainly didn't do Chaucer for Eng Lit O level, but my husband did some (in the original) when he ... be at A level and whether it's optional will depend on the school. Anyone here know more about present practice?

In practice all set books are "optional", because if there are five of them you only have to answer on three of your choice. Strangely, I can't remember what texts I did revise for and answer when I did A-level English in the mid '70s, but I can remember the two that I knew I wasn't going anywhere near (and consequently never even bothered to finish reading) a chunk of Chaucer and an annoying "modern" novel by William Golding: Pincher Martin.

Ross Howard
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Dear all, I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran. I'd appreciate your reply.

I went to high school in Jamaica and the US, and if it weren't for the rest of the thread I'd have no idea what you had written. I think Chaucer was offered at my American high school, but I never studied him.

SML
Lists, is it? Great Expectations and Twelfth Night (both of ... wetness of poetry (de la Mare). Hello clouds. Hello sky.

Gosh, I am surprised - de la Mare was considered pretty old-fashioned even when I was at school and, as ... feel for poetry. I will never forget the day she read us Dylan Thomas' "And Death shall have no dominion".

We got Matthew Arnold (Sore- and Rusty-Bum and all that) and "Julius Caesar", both of which ought to have appealed; I suspect that the fact that neither did is just down to bad teaching - being made to memorise great slabs was the outstanding feature. I can read either happily now, but the third offering, "Northanger Abbey" was spoiled for me forever, I suspect. Although maybe, if you have recovered enough to read Jane again, I should try it.

Don Aitken
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To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
Snap! We did the Trumpet Major too, which ruined it ... don't remember another novel, though there may have been one.

Lists, is it? Great Expectations and Twelfth Night (both of which utterly captivated me). And about half of "Ten 20th ... (Frost) and drove me to distraction when considering the supreme wetness of poetry (de la Mare). Hello clouds. Hello sky.

I forgot to mention the Shakespeare - we did Julius Caesar" for O-Level. I can still remember the appalling performance we saw at Derby Playhouse. Some strange, unidentified character wandered on and off the stage throughout the first two Acts. We assumed it was the producer's brother-in-law. And Octavius was knock-kneed and spoke in a falsetto. Weird.

I think that the O-Level syllabus gave us the choice of that or Sheridan's "The Rivals", but no-one at school offered us the option.

NUJMB, by the way.
Fran
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I can read either
happily now, but the third offering, "Northanger Abbey" was spoiled for me forever, I suspect. Although maybe, if you have recovered enough to read Jane again, I should try it.

Do. It's worth it, in my opinion, although I'm never going to be a rabid Janeite.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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