1 2 3 4  6 7 8 11
As a former teacher, I can confirm that at one time (I suppose as late as 1960) Chaucer in the ... however, I think - not a requirement. Once the initial shock had passed, pupils found Chaucer much easier than Shakespeare.

I can date that pair precisely to 1959 (O&C O Level) - unless we only did part of the Prologue; the Nun's Priest's Tale was in there as well. Bundled with Henry V, and mosquito larvae (or was that Biol?).
Paul
In bocca al Lupo!
Snap! We did the Trumpet Major too, which ruined it ... don't remember another novel, though there may have been one.

Lists, is it? Great Expectations and Twelfth Night (both of which utterly captivated me). And about half of "Ten 20th ... (Frost) and drove me to distraction when considering the supreme wetness of poetry (de la Mare). Hello clouds. Hello sky.

I recollect A levels being my introduction to Hopkins and Sons and Lovers, both of which struck me with the stunning force of a cattle maul in the centre of the forehead. And our Shakespeare was King Lear which, if I'd known then what I know now, I would have cheered loudly to be told we were going to read it over and over and spend hours discussing it.
And I can't bring to mind what else there was.

John Dean
Oxford
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
It seems that there is hardly anybody here who didn't* ... that this was not *exactly what Shakespeare had in mind.

What a pity. We were somewhat more fortunate, being taken to Stratford to see Judi Dench in Twelfth Night. I can see and hear her to this day.

She lives nearby?

John Dean
Oxford
It seems that there is hardly anybody here who didn't* ... that this was not *exactly what Shakespeare had in mind.

What a pity. We were somewhat more fortunate, being taken to Stratford to see Judi Dench in Twelfth Night. I can see and hear her to this day.

But you missed the entirely unforgettable experience of watching Twelfth Night at Chesterfield Playhouse. The actress playing Olivia had obviously not had much experience in performing in a long and cumbersome dress. Every time she turned quickly, she would get ahead of her dress, which would then whip round, and hit her in the back of the legs. She did a little jump every time it happened.
I think that one of the best things that I remember from my schooldays is that we went to the theatre so often. We could see productions at Derby, Chesterfield, and (in a different league altogether) Nottingham. We even went to Sheffield a couple of times. That kind of provincial rep. doesn't seem to exist in the US - I don't know if it exists still in England in the same way.
All those companies put on Shakespeare, Wilde, Goldsmith, Shaw - as well as new plays by young playwrights. Not all the productions were the best, but the language survives, no matter what the company does in staging (I saw "As You Like It" on rollerskates at the Long Wharf in New Haven, so I know what I'm talking about). It makes such a difference, I think, to see plays performed, rather than just reading them.

I am happy to see that there are lots of outdoor productions of Shakespeare here in the summer - every town in Connecticut seems to put on a play in the park. It introduces people to plays as they were supposed to be seen - as an entertainment, rather than as an intellectual exercise.
Fran
As posted earlier, this appears to be "Early English." Fifty ... included Chaucer's English (1400 Canterbury Tales preface and one tale).

I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly I took O-level English (Language and Literature, separately, but Chaucer ... and rootle around up there looking for them.) Katy Jennison spamtrap: remove the first two letters after the @

We did them for O Level (The Preface, The Nonnes Prestes Tale and summat else) in the original. I only found the cribs several years later! Such an honest lad.
Cheers, Sage
("A pauvre widwe somdel stap in age,
Was Whilom dwelling in a narwe cottage,
Stonding in a dale." Lovely stuff.)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Waste of space IYAM.

Who did?

FoS.

Adrian Smith
It seems that there is hardly anybody here who didn't* ... that this was not *exactly what Shakespeare had in mind.

What a pity. We were somewhat more fortunate, being taken to Stratford to see Judi Dench in Twelfth Night. I can see and hear her to this day.

We were taken to a very peculiar production of the Tempest at the Oxford Playhouse, in which Alistair Sim, of all people, played Prospero.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
I want to know if high school students in the US, Canada, or Britain learn the following sort of English. If so, is it a obligatory school subject or optional one? Tham cynge licoden peran.

To me that isn't a sort of English at all, it's some predecessor language. In my high school (in Canada) we did nothing older than Shakespeare, and I'm not entirely sure that his language should be considered English either.

Mark Brader "It is hard to believe that any Biblical passage, Toronto no matter how powerful, could make an entire (Email Removed) Soviet submarine crew speak English and not even realize they were doing it." Mark Leeper
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
What a pity. We were somewhat more fortunate, being taken ... Night. I can see and hear her to this day.

She lives nearby?

Only in my memory, more's the pity.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Show more