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I remembered the artist's name - Tony Cragg - and here's the thing itself, or something very like it:

Browsing through the collection, I notice that some of his works are described as "aquatint and spitbite on paper". What the heck is "spitbite"? A google search has been most unhelpful, and dictionary.com doesn't seem to recognize the word.

A form of etching, apparently.
Googling led me to
http://www.chester.ac.uk/art/kiekeben/new.pdf
Scroll down and you'll find the details - for some reason I am unable to copy selections from the document

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
We were taken to see Sophocles' Antigone at a reproduction amphitheatre somewhere in southern England. It was all Greek to me.

We had that experience too. Was it Marlborough?

Katy Jennison
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I had the experience at Tate Modern of looking at a corner of a room and wondering - seriously wondering, ... department. Whichever it was, it occupied my attention for considerably longer than some of the corners which clearly were exhibits.

I remember this one - assuming it was the same one. I was rather impressed by it.
But I know for sure that what most fascinated us last time we were there was not an exhibit: we spent a good twenty minutes, perhaps more, suureptitiously watching, through an adjacent door, gallery staff meticulously and with infinite slowness unpacking and assembling a piece of sculpture. I have almost no recollection of the sculpture itself: what we loved was the way in which they walked around the packing-cases, moved parts of it a few millimetres in one direction or another, consulted in small groups before the slightest scintilla of progress was attempted, and watched each component lowered into place with the gravest of expressions. It was a masterpiece of theatre.

Katy Jennison
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We were taken to see Sophocles' Antigone at a reproduction amphitheatre somewhere in southern England. It was all Greek to me.

We had that experience too. Was it Marlborough?

I don't remember where it was. It was a good coach ride from Guildford, where I was then at school, and Marlborough would fit. There were a lot of trees around.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
That's the very thing, thank you. I didn't have my ... her the photo - better three years late than never.

I am doubly pleased, then - just dredging up the artist's name wasa significant achievement for me. But the photo ... clutter on my desk, but the scissors and stapler don't fit verywell. I suppose I just don't have sufficient talent.

So good to hear of a revival of craft skills. Maybe I can stop saying that art was once something anybody could have thought of but hardly anybody could have done, but is now something anybody could have done but hardly anybody would have thought of.

Mike.
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Isn't that great! My favourite thing in Tate Modern is the xploding shed, with every tiny bit suspended as it flies awy from the centre... can't find a picture though.

I haven't been to the Tate Modern recently. I went soon after it opened, and I was deeply disappointed by the way they used the space. They had that glorious turbine hall, but the exhibits were all in the little office rooms. Are they using the space better now?

Fran
As posted earlier, this appears to be "Early English." Fifty ... included Chaucer's English (1400 Canterbury Tales preface and one tale).

I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly I took O-level English (Language and Literature, separately, but Chaucer ... confirm or refute my recollection, so that I won't have to go and rootle around up there looking for them.)

We did. Exactly as described: the preface and one tale - can't even remember which one it was - could have been the Wife of Bath or the Pardoner, but that is lost in the mists of time. However, I do suspect that that was for O-Level English Lit, not for O-Level English.

Rob Bannister
I'm not sure we studied Chaucerian English (language), though. Admittedly ... to go and rootle around up there looking for them.)

Rootle by all means if you care to. I find myself unable to remember the urgent errand that I had ... also examined the original text at some point but never had to get to grips with it in any detail.

We definitely used the original in class, although many of us read Coghill in our spare time, mainly to find the rude bits, which led to an outbreak of the verb swyve in my class.

Rob Bannister
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Luckily (for me) he wasn't with us when we visited ... suppose, half-empty of sand depending on which "*imism" you favour.

It may have been half full of sand, but it was half empty of water, gold and/or moon dust.

It was entirely empty of those things. But only half empty of sand.
John Dean
Oxford
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